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Hey, maybe one should take it easy with this devil juice for a while....:

"The owner and staff of Dan Tana's, one of his favorite restaurants, said that Spector had two rum cocktails there after 12:30 a.m. Monday morning. Sources also say he then went to the House of Blues, where he bought a Bacardi 151 rum drink. House of Blues employees have said they saw Clarkson leave with Spector in his chauffeur-driven Mercedes S430 about 2:30 a.m...."

I can see it now, this will become the famed "Zombie Defense" precedent:
"...my client suffered from temp insanity just like the first customer of Don The Beachcomber that imbibed the concoction! Allow me to quote rum researcher Beachbum Berry from "The Book of Tiki":"...Legend has it that Don’s most famous drink, the Zombie, was improvised
on the spot to help a hung-over customer get through an important business
meeting. When later asked how the cure worked, the customer said, “I felt
like the living dead -- it made a Zombie out of me.”

...maybe it made Phil believe he WAS Z-man Ronnie Varsell after all, bearing the creepy similarity of the shooting to the ending of "Beyond The Valley Of The Dolls...

[ Edited by: bigbrotiki on 2003-02-11 10:34 ]

F

He Hit Me (And It Felt Like A Kiss)

-will 50cent being doing the 2003 remake as "He Shot Me.."?

my favorite was the $500 tip on a $50 meal.

Is he a total player, or did he read the check wrong and add a zero?

E

My take is, he is and always has been one of the biggest wonks in the music industry, I mean totally off his rocker. He crossed the line from genius to insanity decades ago. Something like this seems to have been inevitable.

As for the $500 tip, it's things like that that have always pissed me off about the rich. I don't begrudge them their money, I don't have any moral qualms about how they make it provided it wasn't through extortion or murder - it's THE STUPID GROTESQUE THINGS THEY DO WITH IT!

aloha,
emspace.

It's because these special ones are far more 'emotionally needy'.
Chuckle.

Trader Woody

K

As for the $500 tip, it's things like that that have always pissed me off about the rich. I don't begrudge them their money, I don't have any moral qualms about how they make it provided it wasn't through extortion or murder - it's THE STUPID GROTESQUE THINGS THEY DO WITH IT!

emspace, I have to call you on this one. Tips go to real people who are just as good as the people they are serving, just less fortunate. You don't have to have worked as a waiter as I have to know that it is one of the lowest paid jobs out there, and the people who do it are mostly trying to get a better job. They deserve that $500 and a whole lot more.

It just could be that the service was really, really good. This looks like it's turning out to be one of those great L.A. murder mysteries like the ones that fueled old TV shows like "The Naked City", with screaming tabloid headlines like..."THE JUICE IS LOOSE","LENNY BRUCE FOUND DEAD ON BATHROOM FLOOR...THE SPIKE STILL IN HIS ARM"."BELUSHI CHECKS OUT AT THE MARMONT". But L.A has always been a magnet for anyone with a huge ego & an insasiable appetite for anything that turns their key. And,oh yes, just like our movies, we love a good story with lots of kinky plot twists and a totally unpredictable "I didn't see that comin'" ending. I'm workin' on the script now!

One of my most favorite (not in a weird way though) L.A. murders is that of the Black Dahlia decades ago.

L
laney posted on Fri, Feb 14, 2003 9:10 PM

As a waitress, I have to say I love the $500 tip thing! I also saw an interview with some staff at the restaurant who said he came in often and was always a very generous tipper. You come to know and count on regulars for the majority of your money. I have waited on several rock stars (because I work in a strip club) and know some who tip every waitress awful! There's nothing worse than serving a guy and his entourage a few hundred dollars worth of food and drink only to get way less than 10% tip. Just to go home exausted, turn on Mtv and see him on Cribs with his 10 car garage and elevator! YUCK!

[ Edited by: laney on 2003-02-14 21:12 ]

On 2003-02-14 21:04, Tiki_Bong wrote:
One of my most favorite (not in a weird way though) L.A. murders is that of the Black Dahlia decades ago.

Both pieces of her are in Oakland now, just up the hill from Trader Vic!

--cyn

[ Edited by: cynfulcynner on 2003-02-17 15:27 ]

DZ

On 2003-02-14 21:04, Tiki_Bong wrote:
One of my most favorite (not in a weird way though) L.A. murders is that of the Black Dahlia decades ago.

Bong--
How can you have a "most favorite" murder that is NOT in a weird way??

I hesitate to ask, but do you have a favorite that IS in a weird way?

(IMHO, the Black Dahlia murder was definitely in a weird way... both parts of her...)

Here's an interesting webpage regarding the Black Dahlia:

http://www.bethshort.com/dahhome.htm

On a somewhat related note, I have a buddy who's really into studying serial killers. Here's an interesting webpage he recommended to me:

http://www.crimelibrary.com/serialkillers.htm

Thanks, Pop!

The Beth Short page was most intriguing. For those of a like mind, I'd also recommend

http://www.zodiackiller.com

The message board is a trip. And the site itself is encyclopedic--really an impressive effort to do something about this famous unsolved case, hopeless though that may seem.

I'd also recommend "My Dark Places" by Ellroy (who wrote the most famous book on the Dahlia)--it's a fascinating, harrowing account of his attempts to deal with his own mother's unsolved murder. A little meandering, but still worth a look.

Having met Phil Spector on two occassions, I can say that the man was indeed strange, quirky and a bit frightening. I know that everyone has already judged him guilty, but since not one of us was there and no evidence has been provided the public yet, I suggest we back off and stop acting like some pied piper of a human being.

In case everyone forgot, someone died. Food for thought, indeed, but I get tired of the Low-Brow attitude that, just because our society is run like a Pop culture game show, we have the right to treat violence the same way. Andy Warhol may have been right, but that doesn't mean we have to be proud of the fact.

BC-Da-Da,
I apologize for treating such a tragic turn of events so indifferently. Your right, all the facts aren't in, except that a woman is dead. It's like when the band the Dead Kennedys burst on the scene, a lot of people were righteously indignant about the name because they thought it was just a cheap shot at two of our country's most respected leaders in order to gain quick publicity and free promotion. Not everybody deals with senseless violence in the same way. Some of us go to church and pray, some of us buy flowers to lay at the grave site and some of us get so pissed off we just roll up our anger like a big snowball and hurl it back into the face of America and say "Why do we have to have so many goddamned guns?!?" As the saying goes "guns don't kill people, people kill people" to which I retort "guns don't kill people...BUT THEY SURE HELP". As Hunter S. Thompson wrote "you can turn your back on the man, but don't turn your back on the drug".I think this might be what happened in the Phil Spector case.

[ Edited by: Shipwreckjoey on 2003-02-17 00:36 ]

[ Edited by: Shipwreckjoey on 2003-02-17 08:01 ]

I agree with what you said. I went to London for three weeks in 2002. In the UK, there is no right to bear arms... there are no guns (except whoever owns illegally). That said, I never saw someone weild an illegal weapon, nor did I hear about one in the papers.

My brother has been in London for two years finishing his PhD at the U of London, and has never once read about a gun killing. People can say all they want about guns not killing people, but you are correct to say that they encourage it. I felt totally safe drinking Guinness until 3 in the morning, and then walking back to my hotel. Just my experience, though.

Your experience at 3am differs markedly from the recipients of Jack the Ripper's handiwork, doesn't it?

B

Guess so, Tiki Bong. But then again, I wasn't there at the turn of the century and a lot has changed since Margaret Thatcher, let alone a hundred years.

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