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Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge January 1, 2020

On this week’s Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge radio show we figured it was a good time to reflect on new beginnings as well as all the joys of winter season that enwraps us like an old friend – albeit one with poor circulation!

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge show is broadcast every Wednesday, 5-6 pm Eastern Standard Time (2-3 pm on the West Coast and 10-11 GMT in Europe) at http://www.radiofairfax.org. Radio Fairfax also can be heard on Tune In Radio at tunein.com, and streamed on smartphones by downloading the Tunein app. It also can be streamed on Roku and Google TV at: http://tinyurl.com/3uqfsz9

Past shows are now available to listen to in their entirety at: https://www.mixcloud.com/Flashfriend/

  1. “Here It Is Tomorrow Again,” was written by Patrick Gibbons and Roy Ringwald and is found on the retrospectical compact disc: The Quintessential Billie Holiday, Volume 6: 1938, with Teddy Wilson & His Orchestra, including Mr. Wilson on Piano; Henry James on Trumpet; Benny Morton on Trombone; Edgar Sampson and Benny Carter on Alto Saxes; Lester Young and Herschel Evans on Tenor Saxes; Al Casey on Acoustic Guitar; Walter Page on Bass; and Jo Jones on Drums.

  2. The Raymond Scott tune: “The Penguin” appears on the salubrious CD: Celebration on the Planet Mars: A Tribute to Raymond Scott by The Beau Hunks Sextette, a Dutch conglomeration consisting of Robert Veen on Tenor Sax, Ronald Jansen Heijtmajer on Clarinet, Menno Daams on Trumpet, Jakob Klaasse on Piano, Gert-Jan Blom on Bass and Louis Debij on Drums.

  3. “Accentuate the Positive,” the classic 1944 song by Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer, drawn with needle nosed pliers from the from 1940s radio broadcasts included on the historical document: Danny Kaye -- Kid From Brooklyn.

  4. “Snowfall,” which came from the pen of Claude Thornhill, was performed by Juan Garcia Esquivel on his 1962 sonic spectacular: More of Other Sounds, Other Worlds, featuring Esquivel on Piano and Marimba.

  5. “Lonely Winter,” the 1967 song by Henry Mancini and Rod McKuen, found on the 1962 antipodal album: Rains in the Tropics: Songs and Sounds of Far Away Lands, spotlighting the talents of Gene Rains on Vibes.

  6. “It Might as Well Be Spring,” concocted by Rodgers & Hammerstein for the 1945 film: State Fair, sung by Joanie Sommers on her 1959 debut LP: Positively The Most! arranged and conducted by Tommy Oliver.

  7. “Saturnian Sleigh Ride,” waxed in 1957 by Shorty Rogers and His Giants for his 1958 long playing autobiographical interface: Portrait of Shorty, including Mr. Rogers on Flugelhorn, Lou Levy on Piano, Monte Budwig on Bass and Stan Levey on Drums.

  8. “Midnight Sun,” separately collabarized by Lionel Hampton and Johnny Mercer, vocalized by Ella Fitzgerald on her 1957 outstanding album: Like Someone in Love, featuring Stan Getz on Alto Sax.

  9. “When the World Was Young (Ah, the Apple Tree),” composed by M. Philippe Gerard and Johnny Mercer, and sung by the incomparable Nancy Wilson on her 1967 luxurious LP: Lush Life, Arranged by Oliver Nelson, spotlighting the talents of John Collins on Electric Guitar, Doug Trenner on Piano, Buster Williams on Bass and Shelley Manne on Drums.

  10. “The Skaters Waltz,” the classic composed in 1882 by Émile Waldteufel and recorded in 1961 by the multi-reed master Roland Kirk With organist extraordinaire Jack McDuff for the labial LP: Kirk’s Work, with Joe Benjamin on Bass and Arthur Taylor on Drums.

  11. “June in January” By Ralph Rainger and Leo Robin was introduced by Bing Crosby in the 1934 movie: Here Is My Heart, and comes from the emotional album: Guitar Moods by Mundell Lowe, including Phil Bodner on English Horn, Trigger Alpert on String Bass and Ed Shaugnessy on Drums.

  12. “Nothing Will Be as It Was Tomorrow,” inked by the Brazilian composer Milton Nascimento was sung by Mark Murphy on his 1983 luscious LP: Brazil Song.

  13. “Esperanca de Mar Azul (Hope for a Blue Sea)” was performed by Nancy Vieira with Tito Paris and comes from the apt anthology: Putumayo Presents Bossa Nova Around the World.

  14. “Snow Samba” was composed by Clarinetist Paquito D’Rivera and Trumpeter Claudio Roditi, who play it on Mr. D’Rivera’s hallucinatory CD: Brazilian Dreams, featuring the New York Voices -- who are Kim Nazarian, Lauren Kinhan, Peter Eldridge and Darmon Meader on Lead Vocal -- with John Ashby on Trombone; Helio Alves on Piano, Marty Ashby on Electric Guitar, Oscar Stagnaro on Bass and Paulo Braga on Drums. Recorded live in 2001 at Pittsburgh’s Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge October 30, 2019

On this week’s show we marked the hallowed and harrowing harbingers of Halloween. Over the hour we mulled the musical mysteries of the many multifarious myths and monsters, carnivorous cannibals and creepish creatures that are asymmetrically associated with this hagiographic holiday, along with coming face to face with some truly terrifying tunes that are simply scarifying all by themselves.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge show is broadcast every Wednesday, 5-6 pm Eastern Standard Time (2-3 pm on the West Coast and 10-11 GMT in Europe) at http://www.radiofairfax.org. Radio Fairfax also can be heard on Tune In Radio at tunein.com, and streamed on smartphones by downloading the Tunein app. It also can be streamed on Roku and Google TV at: http://tinyurl.com/3uqfsz9

Past shows from this year are now available to listen to in their entirety at: https://www.mixcloud.com/Flashfriend/

  1. “Bewitched (Bothered and Bewildered),” the theme to the 1964-72 TV Series by Howard Greenfield blended with the Rodgers & Hart classic composed for their 1940 Broadway musical: Pal Joey, performed by the Ukulele master Benny Chong on his crepuscular compact disc: Ukulele Jazz – Live in Concert in Hilo, Hawaii, Recorded at the Palace, with Brian Yasui on Bass.

  2. “San Francisco Fan” recorded in 1947 by Cab Calloway and His Orchestra and written by Sammy Mysels, taken from the cacophonous compilation: Jazz Noire – Darktown Sleaze From the Mean Streets of 1940s L.A.

  3. The 1956 recording “Little Demon” found on the reliquarious retrospective: Voodoo Jive: The Best of Screamin’ Jay Hawkins.

  4. “Walk the Lonely Night” by Renzo Cesana, taken from the anthropomorphic anthology: Ultra Lounge The Crime Scene – Spies, Thighs & Private Eyes.

  5. The 1942 recording of “Evil Gal Blues,” composed by Lionel Hampton and Leonard Feather and found on that diabolical diadem: The Definitive Dinah Washington, featuring Milt Bruckner on Piano and Joe Morris on Trumpet.

  6. The Oscar Brown Jr.song “But I Was Cool” sung by Karrin Allyson on her pedal extemis CD: Footprints, with Todd Strait on Drums, Bruce Barth on Piano, Frank Wess on Flute and Peter Washington on Bass.

  7. “Butcher Pete (Parts 1 & 2)” by Buster Poindexter from his 20-year-old alcoholic album: Buster's Happy Hour.

  8. “Been Caught Stealing,” the Jane’s Addiction song waxed by Richard Cheese and his band, Lounge Against the Machine, on his scabrous CD: Apertif for Destruction, featuring Bobby Ricotta on Piano and Gordon Brie on Bass.

  9. The Screamin’ Jay Hawkins classic “I Put a Spell on You” taken from the combustible collection: Nina Simone – Compact Jazz.

  10. “I Feel So Good” by Mose Allison, released in 1976 on his psychologistical LP: Your Mind Is on Vacation.

  11. “I Want It All” by Bruno Nicola, from the 1969 Italian movie: Femmine Insaziabili, found on the cinematic CD: Beat at Cinecitta.

  12. “The Infernal Trio (Il Trio Infernale)” from the soundtrack of the 1974 Italian film found on the cinematic three-CD collection: Ennio Morricone – 50 Movie Theme Hits

  13. “Shrunken Heads” by the Houstonian ensemble Clouseaux from their ablative album: Lagoon! which refers to Sig’s Lagoon Record Store in Houston and the hipster slang word “lagoon,” which was used by the Beatniks as equivalent of “cool.” The musicians include Jay Brooks on Vocals and Bass, Kelly Doyle on Electric Guitar, David Cummings on Synthesizer, and Claudio De Pujadas on Drums and Percussion.

  14. “Dark Story” by Messer Chups from that academic anthology: Russkie Wig Out! Surf/Electro/Exotica From Behind the Iron Curtain.

  15. “Gunfight at the Zombie Mineshaft” by The Metrolites from their creselated compact disc: In Spy-Fi, featuring composers Scott Morschhauser on Vocals and Kathleen Gallagher on Electric Guitar, with Nervous Neal Smith on Tenor Sax, Devin Kirby-Hansen on Bass and Josh Duffee on Drums and Percussion.

[ Edited by: Dr. Zarkov 2020-01-01 16:13 ]

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