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Celebrating classic and modern Polynesian Pop

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Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge March 25, 2020

On this week’s show we once again celebrated the birthdays of just some of the fine musical artists who slid onto this mortal coil during the magniloquent month of March.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge show is broadcast every Wednesday, 5-6 pm Eastern Standard Time (2-3 pm on the West Coast and 10-11 GMT in Europe) at http://www.radiofairfax.org. Radio Fairfax also can be heard on Tune In Radio at tunein.com, and streamed on smartphones by downloading the Tunein app. It also can be streamed on Roku and Google TV at: http://tinyurl.com/3uqfsz9

Past shows are now available to listen to in their entirety at: https://www.mixcloud.com/Flashfriend/

  1. “Moonlight and Roses” came from our Birthday Boy’s ample anthology: Sol Hoopii in Hollywood – His First Recordings, 1925, with the Waikiki Hawaiian Trio, including Mr. Hoopii on Lap Steel Guitar and Dave Mahuka on Vocals.

  2. “Riverboat Shuffle,” written by Hoagy Carmichael, Mitchell Parish and Dick Voynow, was waxed in 1927 by our Birthday Celebrant Bix Beiderbecke on Cornet and is found on his rigorous retrospective: In a Mist, with Don Murray on Clarinet, Eddie Lang on Acoustic Guitar and Irving Riskin on Piano.

  3. The W.C. Handy composition “Aunt Hagar's Blues” was performed in 1928 by King Oliver and is found on his swankish CD: Riverside Blues, featuring our March Natal Notable Barney Bigard on Clarinet, along with His Royal Highness on Cornet, Omer Simeon on Alto Sax and J.C. Higginbotham on Trombone.

  4. “Them There Eyes,” the song composed in 1930 by Maceo Pinkard, Doris Tauber and William Tracey, recorded by our Birthday Boy – the Hawaiian master musician, arranger, conductor and composer Matt Catingub – on his 1999 soigne CD: Big Kahuna and the Copa Cat Pack: Hawaiian Swing.

  5. “Interlude,” which was the original title for “A Night in Tunisia,” written by Dizzy Gillespie, Raymond Leveen and Frank Paparelli, sung by our March Birthday Celebrant Sarah Vaughan in 1944 and taken from her bodacious Box Set: Young Sassy, featuring Mr. Gillespie on Trumpet and the famed jazz writer Leonard Feather on Piano, along with Aaron Sachs on Clarinet, Georgie Auld on Tenor Sax, Chuck Wayne on Guitar, Jack Lesberg on Bass and Morey Field on Drums.

  6. “Minor Romp” (A/K/A “Jacquet and Coat”), recorded in 1946 by the tenor sax master and featured on his copacetic collection: The Illinois Jacquet Story, including our Birthday Boy Sir Charles Thompson on Piano, Russell Jacquet on Trumpet, John Simmons on Bass and Johnny Otis on Drums.

  7. “Girl From Uganda” was composed and conducted by our Birthday Celebrant Les Baxter, his Orchestra and Chorus and appears on his 1967 atmospheric album: African Blue.

  8. The Johnny Noble classic “Ku'u Pua Lei Mokihana,” was recorded by the Hawaiian music master on his 1975 landmark LP: The Gabby Pahinui Hawaiian Band, Vol. 1, including Mr. Pahinui on Vocals and 12-String Guitar, with our Natal Numinary Ry Cooder on Mandolin.

  9. “All of Me,” the 1931 song by Gerald Marks and Seymour Simons for the 1932 movie: Careless Lady, recorded by the vocalease pioneer and our Birthday Boy King Pleasure on his scintillacious CD: Interpretation of Moods.

  10. The Shorty Rogers composition, “Curbstone Scuffle,” recorded in 1946 by Serge Chaloff and found on his righteous retrospective: The Baritone Sax Master, featuring our Birthday Celebrant Flip Phillips on Tenor Sax as part of Sonny Berman’s Big Eight, along with: Sonny Berman and Bill Harris on Trumpet, Ralph Burns on Piano, Chuck Wayne on Electric Guitar, Artie Bernstein on Bass and Don Lamond on Drums.

  11. “S'posin',” written by the lyricist Andy Razaf and composer Paul Denniker and recorded in 1956 by the singer Maxine Sullivan & Her All-Stars for her ambitious album: Memories of You -- A Tribute to Andy Razaf, with our March Natal Notable Dick Hyman on Piano, Charlie Shavers on Trumpet, Buster Bailey on Clarinet, Hilton Jefferson on Alto Sax, and Organ, Milt Hinton on Bass and Louis Burnam on Drums.

  12. “Pick Yourself Up,” composed by Dorothy Fields and Jerome Kern for the 1936 Fred Astaire-Ginger Rogers movie: Swing Time, sung in 1957 by our young Birthday Boy Mark Murphy on his able album: Let Yourself Go, with the band arranged and conducted by Ralph Burns.

  13. “Our Love Rolls On” was written by our Birthday Boy David Frishberg and was waxed in 1988 on the album: Full Circle by Jackie & Roy – who were the husband-and-wife team of Jackie Cain on Vocal and Roy Kral on Piano, supported by Bill Watrous on Trombone; Conte Candoli on Flugelhorn; Bill Perkins on Baritone Sax; Bob Cooper on Tenor Sax; Monty Burrows on Bass and Jeff Hamilton on Drums.

  14. “Samba Saravah,” composed by the Brazilians Baden Powell and Vinicius de Moraes and Frenchman Pierre Barouh for the 1966 movie: A Man and a Woman, sung by our March Natal Notable Stacey Kent on her comestible compact disc: Breakfast on the Morning Tram, accompanied by John Parricelli on Acoustic Guitar, Graham Harvey on Piano, her husband Jim Tomlinson on Tenor Sax, Dave Chamberlin on Bass and Matt Skelton on Drums.

  15. “Afternoon in Paris,” composed by John Lewis and performed by pianist and our March Birthday Girl Marian McPartland on her august album: Twilight World, recorded in 2007 when she was nearly 90 years old, with Gary Mazzaroppi on Bass and Glenn Davis on Drums.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge March 18, 2020

Throughout the history of 20th and 21st century music popular music has absorbed influences from Latin American musical cultures, sometimes drawing directly from those cultures’ musicians, instruments and compositions. Sometimes non-Latin musicians incorporated what they thought was Latin but actually created something else entirely that we might most accurately describe as “Latinesque,” which is what we swung to on this week’s radio show.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge show is broadcast every Wednesday, 5-6 pm Eastern Standard Time (2-3 pm on the West Coast and 10-11 GMT in Europe) at http://www.radiofairfax.org. Radio Fairfax also can be heard on Tune In Radio at tunein.com, and streamed on smartphones by downloading the Tunein app. It also can be streamed on Roku and Google TV at: http://tinyurl.com/3uqfsz9

Past shows are now available to listen to in their entirety at: https://www.mixcloud.com/Flashfriend/

  1. “Jamaica Rhumba” performed in 1949 by Woody Herman and his Orchestra, spotlighting Mary Ann McCall on Vocal, and found on the boundaryless box set: South of the Border – Greatest Latin Hits.

  2. “Daddy Daddy,” waxed in 1952 and featured on the anthemic anthology: Rockin’ in Rhythm – The Best of Ruth Brown.

  3. “Twist All Night,” the 1961 song from the movie of the same name found on the copacetic collection: Louis Prima – Complete Collectors Series, featuring composer Louis Prima on Vocal and Trumpet, with his partner in crime and fellow composer Sam Butera on Tenor Sax, along with his band, The Witnesses: Jack Marshall on Electric Guitar; James Blount, Jr. on Trombone, Willie McCumber on Piano, Amato Rodrigues on Electric Bass and Bobby Morris on Drums.

  4. The 1954 single “I Need a Man” by the singer Gloria Irving, taken from the British conflagrative compilation: Mambo Jukebox – Rumba and Afro Latin Accented Rhythm & Blues 1949-1960.

  5. “Jahbero,” composed and performed in 1948 by Pianist Tadd Dameron and his sextet, including Wardell Gray on Tenor Sax, Fats Navarro on Trumpet, Curley Russell on Sting Bass, Kenny Clarke on Drums and Chano Pozo on Congas, taken from the bounteous box set: The Wardell Gray Story.

  6. The classic “Soul Bossa Nova” arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones for his 1962 slightly mislabeled LP: Big Band Bossa Nova – The Newest Latin American Rhythm, where you would have to search hard to find any evidence of an actual bossa nova beat. This song, which became the theme for the Austin Powers movies, features Lalo Schifrin on Piano, along with Phil Woods on Alto Sax, Paul Gonsalves on Tenor Sax, Clark Terry on Trumpet & Flugelhorn, Roland Kirk on Flute & Alto Flute, Jerome Richardson on Flute, Alto Flute & other Woodwinds, Jim Hall on Electric & Acoustic Guitar, Chris White on Bass, Rudy Collins on Drums, and Jack Del Rio, Carlos Gomez and Jose Paula on Percussion.

  7. “A Man and a Woman,” performed by flautist Herbie Mann and singer Tamiko Jones, written by Francis Lai and Pierre Barouh for the 1966 French movie of the same name and included on Mann and Jones’ 1967 LP also called A Man and a Woman, found on the choleric collection: The Leopard Lounge.

  8. “Cha Cha Cha for Gia,” from the 1957 movie: Four Girls in Town, drawn from the composer’s variegated vitae: The Versatile Henry Mancini.

  9. “Bossa Beat,” composed by Franco de Gemini and A. Alessandrroni for the 1972 movie: Si Può Fare Molto Con Sette Donne, found on the historical document: Beat at Cinecitta, featuring music from the famed Italian movie studio.

  10. “Canadian Sunset,” the 1956 song by Norman Gimbel and Eddie Heywood recorded in 1962 by Juan Garcia Esquivel on his auspicious album: More of Other Worlds, Other Sounds, featuring Esquivel’s pianistical touches.

  11. “Song of Delilah,” composed by Ray Evans, Jay Livingston and Victor Young for the 1949 movie: Samson and Delilah, from the 1962 luxurious LP: Rains in the Tropics: Songs and Sounds of Far Away Lands by the Exotica arranger and vibraphonist Gene Rains, with Byron F. Peterson on Piano Archie Grant on Bass, and Allen Watanabe on Percussion.

  12. A two-song medley of “Bongo Bash” and “Sax Con Ritmo,” the former composed by Bobby Black and performed by bongo drummer Pepe Dominguin on his 1960 LP: Mad Drums, the latter waxed by the ubiquitous bongoist Jack Costanzo on his 1959 LP: Latin Fever, featuring Jay Corre on Tenor Sax.

  13. The Shorty Rogers composition: “Diablo's Dance,” arranged and conducted by Rogers, with Art Pepper on Alto Sax, Don Fagerquist on Trumpet, Stu Williamson on Valve Trombone, Red Callender on Tuba, Bill Holman on Tenor Sax, Bud Shank on Baritone Sax, Russ Freeman on Piano, Monty Budwig on Bass and Shelly Manne on Drums. Recorded in 1957, this was unreleased until 2008 when it was included on compact disc with the album: Mucho Calor.

  14. “I’ve Got You Under My Skin,” the Cole Porter song from the 1936 MGM movie musical: Born to Dance, recorded live in Los Angeles in 1954 by Dinah Washington and featured on her Compact Jazz CD, with Max Roach on Drums, Junior Mance on Piano and on Trumpets Clark Terry, Maynard Ferguson and Clifford Brown.

  15. “Gambit” from the 1999 ambidextrous album: The Now Sound of Ursula 1000.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge March 11, 2020

Appropriatatively for a Tiki lounge at this special time of year, the theme of this week’s imbibulous and intoxicatious Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge radio show was partying and alcoholical spirits, along with a few things Irish tossed in for good measure.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge show is broadcast every Wednesday, 5-6 pm Eastern Standard Time (2-3 pm on the West Coast and 10-11 GMT in Europe) at http://www.radiofairfax.org. Radio Fairfax also can be heard on Tune In Radio at tunein.com, and streamed on smartphones by downloading the Tunein app. It also can be streamed on Roku and Google TV at: http://tinyurl.com/3uqfsz9

Past shows are now available to listen to in their entirety at: https://www.mixcloud.com/Flashfriend/

  1. “Green Eyes,” the 1929 song by Spanish composers Adolfo Utrera and Nilo Menéndez, translated into English by Eddie Rivera and Eddie Woods, and sung in 1941 by Anita O’Day and Howard Dulany, with Gene Krupa and His Orchestra, featuring the bandleader on Drums and Roy Eldridge on Trumpet, taken from the Bodacious Box Set: Young Anita.

  2. The 1941 ditty “Barstool Cowboy From Old Barstow,” sung by Del Porter accompanied by Spike Jones & His City Slickers from their blustery Box Set: Strictly for Music Lovers.

  3. “Whiskey and Jelly-Roll Blues,” written by Leroy Williams performed in 1946 by Wynonie Harris and His All-Stars and found on British anthropological anthology: Jazz Noire – Darktown Sleaze From the Mean Streets of 1940s L.A.

  4. The classic composition by Rudy Toombs that had been a 1951 hit by The Clovers, “One Mint Julep,” recorded for us in 1963 by Xavier Cugat and His Orchestra for their alcoholical concept album: Cugi’s Cocktails.

  5. “You Goofed,” waxed in 1952 by Slim Gaillard and found on his beauteous Box Set: Laughing in Rhythm.

  6. “Let Me In,” sung by our favorite New York Doll Buster Poindexter on his thematic compact disc: Buster's Happy Hour.

  7. “Gettin' Paid Waltz,” performed by the composer, singer and pianist extraordinaire Mose Allison in 1989, featuring Teddy Degradi on Tenor Sax, and drawn from his Blue Note Jazz Profile.

  8. “The Great City,” written by Curtis Lewis and sung by Joe Williams on his amiable album: Havin’ a Good Time, recorded live at Pio’s in Providence, RI, in December, 1965, with The Junior Mance Trio: Mr. Mance on Piano, Bob Crashaw on Bass and Mickey Roker on Drums.

  9. “Hard Times Come Again No More,” the 1854 song by Stephen Foster performed by Cherish the Ladies on the charitable CD: O’Flaherty’s Rescue, a benefit recording for O’Flaherty’s Irish Channel, the New Orleans French Quarter Irish bar and music venue damaged in Hurricane Katrina.

  10. “Song for Ireland” by Noel McLoughlin, taken from the outstanding anthology: ARC Music 35th Anniversary 1976-2011.

  11. “Green Among the Gold,” written by Steve and Rosalind Barnes about Irish immigrants to Australia, recorded by Baltimore’s own Marcus Dagan on his 2008 compact disc: This Train Still Runs, featuring Alice Pratley on Backing Vocal & Violin and Taylor Rankin on Violin along with John Woolridge on Keyboards, Guitars and Bass.

  12. “Wonderful Land,” the 1962 recording by the famed British guitar band, The Shadows, found on their righteous retrospective: 30 All Time Greatest Hits.

  13. “Green Sea,” from the 1997 copacetic compact disc: Surf-N-Burn by the Blue Stingrays, who in reality were really members of Tom Pretty’s backup band, The Heartbreakers.

  14. “Fist on the Green,” by Clouseaux from their self-titled CD, featuring Steffany Johnston and Tomas Escalante on Vocals, with David Cummings on Piano, Ryan Gabbart on Trombone, Steve Ruth on Trumpet, Jay Brooks on Bass and Claudio De Pujadas on Drums.

  15. “Tomorrow the Green Grass” from the creative compact disc: Lua-O-Milo – The Exotic Sounds of Skip Heller, including Mr. Heller on Piano, DJ Bonebrake on Vibes, Robert Drasnin on Clarinet and Alto Sax, Marc Sherman on Alto Flute and Bass Clarinet, Leroy Anderson on Harp, Frank Lee Sprague on Bass and Michael Dubin on Bongo Drums

  16. “Danny Boy,” the folk tune known as “Londonderry Air” until 1910 when lyrics were added by Frederic Weatherly, sung in 1951 by Al Hibbler on his landmark LP: After the Lights Go Down Low, with The Billie Kyle Orchestra, featuring Billie Kyle on Piano; Shorty Baker on Trumpet and Tyree Glenn on Vibes.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge March 4, 2020

On this week’s Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge radio show we once again promenaded the penumbra of pop and exotica music in all its perambulative permutations.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge show is broadcast every Wednesday, 5-6 pm Eastern Standard Time (2-3 pm on the West Coast and 10-11 GMT in Europe) at http://www.radiofairfax.org. Radio Fairfax also can be heard on Tune In Radio at tunein.com, and streamed on smartphones by downloading the Tunein app. It also can be streamed on Roku and Google TV at: http://tinyurl.com/3uqfsz9

Past shows are now available to listen to in their entirety at: https://www.mixcloud.com/Flashfriend/

  1. “On a Typical Tropical Night,” written by Johnny Burke and Arthur Johnston for the 1936 movie: Go West Young Man, sung by Mae West on her antic anthology: Come Up and See Me Sometime – 30 Original Mono Recordings 1933-1954, accompanied by Xavier Cugat & His Orchestra.

  2. “Voodoo Dreams” by Les Baxter and His Orchestra from the 1959 louche LP Jungle Jazz.

  3. “While We're Young,” the 1943 song by Alec Wilder, Morty Palitz and William Engvick, recorded by the noted arranger Bob Thompson for his 1959 lascivious LP: Mmm Nice!, featuring Larry Bunker on Vibes and Bud Shank on Flute.

  4. “The Boulevard of Broken Dreams,” the 1933 song by Al Dubin and Harry Warren that was used in the 1934 movie: Moulin Rouge, from Juan Garcia Esquivel’s circa 1960 album: Music From a Sparkling Planet, with Monette Malvar, Pennni Prior, Yvonne De Bourbon, Maria Caruso, Carolyne Day, Delia Lee and Anna Sumi on backing vocals

  5. “Strange Cargo,” the composition by Will Bradley, Ray McKinley and Freddie Slack, found on the 1962 lapidarial LP: Far Across the Sea: The Romantic and Exciting Music of Many Lands by the Hawaiian vibraphonist Gene Rains with Byron F. Peterson on Piano.

  6. The Rodgers & Hammerstein song “Happy Talk,” written for the 1949 Broadway musical: South Pacific, sung by Ethel Azama on her 1958 debut LP: Exotic Dreams, including Paul Conrad on Piano. She started her professional career in 1955 as an emcee at the Oasis nightclub in Honolulu before being discovered by Martin Denny.

  7. “Ebb Tide,” composed in 1953 by Robert Maxwell and Carl Sigman, found on the Martin Denny 1958 anthropomorphic album: Exotica II, featuring Mr. Denny on Piano and Arthur Lyman on Vibes.

  8. “Samba de Orfeu,” written by Luis Bonfa was taken from the 1964 Latinesque LP: Bossa Nova With Strings Attached by the Tenor Saxophonist Bill Perkins.

  9. The 1937 recording of “Bumpy Weather Over Newark,” from the antic anthology: The Music of Raymond Scott – Reckless Nights and Turkish Twilights.

  10. “Whatever Lola Wants,” which was written by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross for the 1955 Broadway musical: The Pajama Game, recorded in 1955 as a 45 rpm single and found on the copacetic compact disc collection: Carmen McRae’s Finest Hour, with Jack Pleis & His Orchestra and the Dave Lambert Singers.

  11. The Charles Mingus composition: “Boogie Stop Shuffle” arranged and conducted by Quincy Jones on his 1962 ambulatory album: Big Band Bossa Nova – The Newest Latin American Rhythm, featuring Lalo Schifrin on Piano, Paul Gonsalves on Tenor Sax and Clark Terry on Flugelhorn, along with Phil Woods on Alto Sax, Roland Kirk on Flute and Alto Flute, Jerome Richardson on Flute, Alto Flute and other Woodwinds, Jim Hall on Guitar, Chris White on Bass, Rudy Collins on Drums and Jack Del Rio, Carlos Gomez and Jose Paula on Percussion.

  12. The song that was written by the former “Tonight Show” host Steve Allen, “Banana Split,” performed by the dynamo duo Jackie Cain & Roy Kral and found on the copious compilation: The Songs of Steve Allen.

  13. “If You Were Mine,” the 1935 song by Johnny Mercer and Matt Malneck, recorded in 1963 by Tony Bennett for his landmarkable LP: I Wanna Be Around…, arranged and conducted by Marty Manning with Ralph Sharon on Piano.

  14. “‘Deed I Do,” composed in 1946 by Fred Rose and Walter Hirsch and sung by Blossom Dearie accompanying herself on Piano on her 1956 debut album that was titled Blossom Dearie, with Herb Ellis on Electric Guitar, Ray Brown on Bass and Jo Jones on Drums.

  15. Dean Martin’s 1953 version of the Phil Medley and Vic Adams’ song: “Love Me, Love Me,” with Dick Stabile & Orchestra and The Herman McCoy Singers, from Dino’s righteous retrospective: The Capitol Collectors Series.

  16. “River, River,” which was written by Ben Oakland and Paul Russell and recorded in 1952 by Peggy Lee and included on her conscientious collection: The Absolutely Essential 3 CD Collection.

  17. The Rudy Stevenson composition, “South Seas” performed by the Pianist Wynton Kelly on his 1964 excellent LP: It’s All Right! With Kenny Burrell on Electric Guitar, Paul Chambers on Bass, Jimmy Cobb on Drums.and Candido Camero on Congas.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge February 26, 2020 Birthdays

On this week’s radio show we once again celebrated the birthdays of just some of the fine musical artists who slid onto this mortal coil during the fabulous month of February.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge show is broadcast every Wednesday, 5-6 pm Eastern Standard Time (2-3 pm on the West Coast and 10-11 GMT in Europe) at http://www.radiofairfax.org. Radio Fairfax also can be heard on Tune In Radio at tunein.com, and streamed on smartphones by downloading the Tunein app. It also can be streamed on Roku and Google TV at: http://tinyurl.com/3uqfsz9

Past shows are now available to listen to in their entirety at: https://www.mixcloud.com/Flashfriend/

  1. “12th Street Rag,” the 1914 song by Euday L. and Mary M. Bowman about the red light district in Kansas City, recorded in 1928 by our Birthday Boy Roy Smeck on Steel Guitar, found on the ukesome anthology: With My Little Ukulele in My Hand.

  2. “Two Deuces,” composed by our Natal Notable Lil Hardin, who was the first wife of Louis Armstrong, taken from the historical document: Louis Armstrong, Volume 4: Louis Armstrong and Earl Hines, recorded in 1928 and featuring Mr. Hines on Piano, Fred Robinson on Trombone, Jimmy Strong on Clarinet and Tenor Sax, Mancy Carr on Banjo and Zutty Singleton on Drums.

  3. “Snowy Morning Blues (Alternate Take)” written and performed by our February Birthday Celebrant from his righteous recording: The Original James P. Johnson – 1942-1945 Piano Solos.

  4. “Killin' Myself,” recorded by the singer Ivie Anderson in 1939 with the song’s composer Duke Ellington and his Orchestra on her coloristic collection: I've Got the World on a String, featuring our Birthday Boy Rex Stewart on Cornet along with Cootie Williams on Muted Trumpet.

  5. The hopefully ironically titled “For Europeans Only,” composed by Birthday Celebrant Tadd Dameron and the Tenor Sax Master Illinois Jacquet, waxed in 1947 featuring our Birthday Boy Bill Doggett on Piano along with an all-star lineup of Fats Navarro, Joe Newman, Marion Hazel & Miles Davis on Trumpets, found on the bodacious Box Set: The Illinois Jacquet Story.

  6. “Little White Lies,” the 1930 song written by our Birthday Boy Walter Donaldson was heard in a 1947 recording by Mel Torme from his creative compilation: Sounds of the 20th Century – Love Me or Leave Me.

  7. The George Shearing and David Weiss classic “Lullaby of Birdland, performed in 1959 by our Natal Numinary Arthur Lyman on his album: Leis of Jazz, which was recorded at the Henry J. Kaiser Aluminum Geodesic Dome, Honolulu, featuring Hawaiian native Arthur Lyman on Vibes and Piano, Harold Chang on Timbales and John Kramer on Bass.

  8. “Just a-Sittin' and a-Rockin',” the 1941 song by Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn and Lee Gaines, taken from the 1957 album: Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Duke Ellington Song Book, featuring our February Birthday Boy Joe Mondragon on Bass, along with Paul Smith on Piano, Ben Webster on Tenor Sax, Stuff Smith on Violin, Barney Kessel on Electric Guitar and Alvin Stoller on Drums.

  9. The 1933 song by our Birthday Boy Nacio Herb Brown and Arthur Freed, “Temptation,” performed by Pete Rugolo and His Orchestra on their 1956 ambitious album issued over the years under a number of titles and now known as Adventures in Sound, featuring another February celebrant Don Fagerquist on the second Trumpet solo after Pete Candoli turned in the first Trumpet solo, along with our versatile Birthday Boy Joe Mondragon on Bass, Claude Williamson on Piano and Barney Kessel on Electric Guitar.

  10. “Chilly Winds Don't Blow,” written by Hecky Krasnow and William Lovelock and sung by our Birthday Girl Nina Simone on her copacetic collection: Compact Jazz.

  11. “Just Friends,” the 1931 song by John Klenner and Sam M. Lewis was found on the anthemic anthology: Tony Bennett – Jazz, recorded in 1964 with the help of our February Natal Notable Stan Getz on Tenor Sax joined by Herbie Hancock on Piano, Ron Carter on Bass and Elvin Jones on Drums.

  12. “Says My Heart,” composed by our Birthday Boy Burton Lane and Frank Loesser for the 1938 Fred MacMurray movie: Coconut Grove, waxed by the dynamic vocal duo Jackie & Roy on their auspicious album: Spring Can Really Hang You Up the Most, featuring Roy Kral on Piano, Barney Kessel on Electric Guitar, Red Mitchell on Bass and Shelley Manne on Drums.

  13. “Helen's Advice,” performed in 1950 by Helen Humes and found on her combustive collection: Be-Baba-Leba – 1944-52, featuring our Birthday Celebrant Dexter Gordon’s Orchestra, with Mr. Gordon on Tenor Sax, Maurice Simon on Baritone Sax, Vernon “Geechie” Smith on Trumpet, Ernie Freeman on Piano, Red Callendar on Bass and J.C. Heard on Drums.

  14. “West Coast Blues,” composed by Wes Montgomery and sung by our Birthday Girl Nancy Wilson in 1964 and included on the resissue of her languorous LP: Yesterday's Love Songs Today's Blues, with Jack Wilson on Piano, Wild Bill Davis on Organ, Joe Pass on Electric Guitar, Jimmy Bond on Bass and Kenny Dennis on Drums.

  15. “Winter Tide,” inspired by sight and sounds of the ocean in winter, composed and performed by the Hawaiian Slack-Key Guitar master who shares a birthday this month, Keola Beamer, appearing on his scintillating CD: Moe’uhane Kika – Tales From the Dream Guitar.

  16. “The Portland Cement Factory at Monolith, California,” by Takoma Park native and February Birthday Boy John Fahey from his haunting album: Days Have Gone By, Vol. 6.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge February 19, 2020 Mardi Gras

On this week’s show we took a slight detour from the world of Tiki-ness to celebrate the multifarious and magnanimous magnificence of Mardi Gras. As some of you are aware, the doctor’s family hails from Louisiana and for many generations helped to build, run and literally supply pharmaceuticals to New Orleans, which makes this annual musical migration something of a hopeful and hallowed hajj to the city that care forgot as well as the rest of southern Louisiana.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge show is broadcast every Wednesday, 5-6 pm Eastern Standard Time (2-3 pm on the West Coast and 10-11 GMT in Europe) at http://www.radiofairfax.org. Radio Fairfax also can be heard on Tune In Radio at tunein.com, and streamed on smartphones by downloading the Tunein app. It also can be streamed on Roku and Google TV at: http://tinyurl.com/3uqfsz9

Past shows are now available to listen to in their entirety at: https://www.mixcloud.com/Flashfriend/

  1. “I Ain't Gonna Give Nobody None o' This Jelly Roll,” composed by Spencer & Clarence Williams and recorded in 1922 by Mamie Smith’s Jazz Hounds, found on the erotical retrospective: Mamie Smith – The Essential.

  2. “New Orleans Shout,” performed in 1929 by King Oliver and found on his riverine recording: Riverside Blues, featuring Oliver on Trumpet, Roy Smeck on Guitar and Jimmy Archey on Trombone.

  3. “Milenberg Joys,” the song about the old time entertainment district in New Orleans where many musicians worked, recorded by Rodney Rogers' Red Peppers and taken from the historical document: Slidin' on the Frets: The Hawaiian Steel Guitar Phenomenon.

  4. “When a St. Louis Woman Comes Down to New Orleans,” written by Arthur Johnston, Sam Coslow and Gene Austin, for the 1934 movie: Belle of the Nineties, where it was sung by Mae West, accompanied by the Duke Ellington Orchestra, drawn from her righteous retrospective: Come Up and See Me Sometime – 30 Original Mono Recordings 1933-1954.

  5. “Basin Street Blues” composed by Spencer Williams in 1926 and recorded by New Orleans native and Alto Sax master Pony Poindexter, who also appears on Vocal on the 1962 accelerative album: Pony’s Express, with Sal Nistico and Clifford Jordan on Tenor Sax, Phil Woods and Sonny Redd on Alto Sax, Pepper Adams on Baritone Sax, Tommy Flanagan on Piano, Ron Carter on Bass and Charles Persip on Drums.

  6. “Mausoleum” from the superlatacious 1996 CD: Redneck Riviera by Mike West, who since Hurricane Katrina has lived with his wife and kids in Lawrence, Kansas.

  7. “Let's Call the Whole Thing Off,” the classic George and Ira Gershwin song from the 1937 Fred Astaire-Ginger Rogers movie: Shall We Dance, sung and performed on Piano here by Harry Connick Jr. on his soundtrack album for the 1989 movie: When Harry Met Sally, with arrangements by Marc Sahirman, and featuring Benjamin Jonah Wolfe on Bass and Jeff “Tain” Watts on Drums.

  8. “Orleans Inspiration” by the Pianist Henry Butler for the 2008 combustic compilation: Offbeat -- My Louisiana Music 2008, produced by The Louisiana Department of Culture, Recreation & Tourism.

  9. “They All Ask'd for You” by the Meters, originally a big hit for the Meters in 1975, performed here in 1998 by Rockin’ Dopsie Jr. and the Zydeco Twisters on their creole-ish compact disc: Turn Up the Zydeco!, including Kim Phillips on Organ, Anthony Rubin on Accordion, Alonzo Johnson on Bass; and Alton Rubin Jr. on Drums.

  10. “Je m'en fous pas mal,” performed by the Cajun contemporary band Steve Riley & The Mamou Playboys on their 1995 ambitious album: La Toussaint, with Monsieur Riley on Vocal and Cajun Accordion, Dave Greely on Fiddle, C.C. Adcock on Electric Guitar, Peter Schwartz on Bass and Kevin Dugas on Drums.

  11. The song composed by Joe Liggins, “Going Back to New Orleans,” sung by Deacon John Moore, accompanied by Dr. John on Piano, taken from his scintillacious CD: Deacon John’s Jump Blues.

  12. “Indian Red (Wild Man Memorial)” performed by unidentified Mardi Gras Indians and some actors, which appears on the uneven event: Treme -- Music From the HBO Original Series, Season 1.

  13. “Brother John,” composed by Cyril Neville and recorded in 1976 by the Neville Brothers and The Wild Tchoupitoulas, and found on the copious collection: Treacherous: A History of the Neville Brothers, 1955-1985.

  14. The Clifton Chenier classic “Hot Tamale Baby” performed by Beau Jocque & The Zydeco Hi-Rollers, drawn from the generous CD: Zydeco Giant, with Beau Jocque, whose real name was Andrus Espre, on Vocal and Accordion, Ray Mouton & Kent Pierre Augustine on Electric Guitars, Mike Lockett on Keyboards, Chuck Bush on Electric Bass, Wilfred “Caveman” Pierre on Rubboard and Eddie Bodin on Drums.

  15. “That's Enough of That Stuff,” recorded by Marcia Ball and appearing on the deliriously delightful Box Set: Doctors, Professors, Kings & Queens: The Big Ol' Box of New Orleans.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge February 12, 2020

On this week’s show we interpolated erotical and entropical envelopments inspired by imminent advent of Saint Valentine’s Day.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge is broadcast on Wednesdays, 5-6 pm EDT at: http://www.radiofairfax.org The show is broadcast live; no recorded shows are archived, but some listeners choose to record it on their computers to listen later. Radio Fairfax also can be heard on Tune In Radio at tunein.com, and streamed on smartphones by downloading the Tunein app. It also can be streamed on Roku and Google TV at: http://tinyurl.com/3uqfsz9

  1. “Mai Lohilohi Mai Oe,” recorded by Lena Machado in 1935 at the South Seas nightclub in Hollywood with Sol Hoopi on Steel Guitar, Harry Baty on Acoustic Guitar and George Piltz on Ukulele, included on her righteous retrospective: Hawaiian Song Bird. The double entendre lyrics are said to be about a lover extending the invitation: “Don’t hesitate – come!”

  2. The traditional song “Ko Ma'i Ho'eu'eu (Your Lovely Ma'i)” was recorded by The Brothers Cazimero on their 1998 superlative CD: Destination Paradise. This mele mai was composed in praise of the sexual prowess and genitals of a man. Because of depopulation after the Europeans arrived, the continuity of the Hawaiians was deemed essential, and in the late 19th Century King Kalâkaua popularized the motto "HoOulu Lahui" or "increase the race." In this tribute in song he is given the honorific: Halala, meaning overly large.

  3. “Tewe Tewe,” where once again the words in Hawaiian do double duty, describing a lover’s beauty and describing the O’opu or Red-Tailed Goby Fish, which also is a metaphor for sexual partners, recorded by Hapa on their collaborative compact disc: Malihini, which is sold only at their concerts. This version of the band featured Ron Kuala’au on 12-Stirng Guitar and Barry Flanagan on vocals and Six-String Guitar, with Nathan Aweau on Bass.

  4. “Shores of Hale`iwa” by the Hula Honeys, with Ginger Johnson on Vocal and Guitar and Robyn Kneubuhl on Vocal and Ukulele, is included on the Hawaiian compilation featuring women musicians from the islands of Maui and Hawaii, titled: Wahine.

  5. “My Funny Valentine,” the famed song composed by Rodgers & Hart for the 1937 Broadway musical: Babes in Arms, performed by the Ukulele master Benny Chong on his alchemical album: Ukulele Jazz – Live in Concert in Hilo, Hawaii, recorded live at the Palace in Hilo, featuring Byron Yasui on Bass.

  6. The 1930 song by Harry Ruby and Bert Kalmar, “Three Little Words,” waxed by the Steel Guitar innovator Alvino Rey, included on his rigorous retrospective: So You’re the One! From Sweet to Swing.

  7. “Comin' Home Baby,” The 1961 song by Ben Tucker and Bob Dorough sung by Mel Tormé on his 1962 LP of the same name, with backing vocals by The Cookies -- who later became Ray Charles’ singers, The Raelettes – accompanied by the Shorty Rogers Orchestra, taken from the combustive compilation: The Leopard Lounge.

  8. “Love Me or Leave Me,” written by Gus Kahn and Walter Davidson for the 1930 movie version of the 1928 Ziegfeld musical comedy: Whoopee!, found on the anthemic anthology: Yes, I Can! The Sammy Davis Jr. Story.

  9. “Come In” and “You Wonder How These Things Began” from the very strange 1970 album titled: When Sex Leers Its Inquisitive Head, recorded by the French-born British actor Peter Wyngarde, best known for playing the character Jason King, a bestselling novelist turned sleuth, on British TV in 1968-74. He also played General Klytus in the 1980 movie version of Flash Gordon and took a whip to Diana Rigg who was playing Mrs. Peel in the Hellfire Club in the “A Touch of Brimstone” episode of “The Avengers” TV series. He also appeared on the Dr. Who “Planet of Fire Episode” and was the lover of the actor Alan Bates for 10 years.

  10. You Brought a New Kind of Love to Me, composed by Irving Kahal and performed by Louis Prima Jr. on his 2012 CD: Return of the Wildest, joined by Sarah Speigel on Vocals, with Ryan McKay on Electric Guitar, Marco Fox and Gregg Fox on Keyboards, Marco Palos on Tenor Sax, Philip Clevinger on Trombone, Ted Schumacher on Trumpet, Michael Gerbino on Bass and A.D. Adams on Drums.

  11. The Oscar Brown Jr. song “Forbidden Fruit” found on the erotical retrospective: The Best of Nina Simone – The Colpix Years, recorded in 1961, with Ms. Simone accompanying herself on Piano.

  12. “After the Lights Go Down Low,” written by Leroy Lovett and Allen White, included on the singer Al Hibbler’s 1956 lubricious LP: After the Lights Go Down Low. The Leroy Lovett Orchestra, featuring Leroy Lovett on Piano, Mickey Baker on Electric Guitar and Al Sears on Tenor Sax.

  13. “Shadow of a Lie,” by the European artistic conglomeration: De-Phazz from their 2007 CD: Days of Twang, with Barbara Lahr on Vocals, Stefan Zobeley on Electric Guitar and Bernd Windisch on Bass.

  14. “Soul Love Power,” by the San Francisco group and Burning Man veterans The Mutaytor from their dramatical conflagration: Yelling Theatre in a Crowded Fire.

  15. “Plasir d' Amour (The Pleasure of Love)” composed by Giovanni Martini and sung by Karrin Allyson on her peripatetic production: From Paris to Rio, featuring Rod Fleeman on Guitar and Bob Bowman on Bass.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge February 5, 2020

On this week’s show nodded gracefully towards the upcoming Oscar ceremonies as our musical selections songs and scores that were both nominees and winners of that naked manful handful.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge show is broadcast every Wednesday, 5-6 pm Eastern Standard Time (2-3 pm on the West Coast and 10-11 GMT in Europe) at http://www.radiofairfax.org. Radio Fairfax also can be heard on Tune In Radio at tunein.com, and streamed on smartphones by downloading the Tunein app. It also can be streamed on Roku and Google TV at: http://tinyurl.com/3uqfsz9

Past shows are now available to listen to in their entirety at: https://www.mixcloud.com/Flashfriend/

  1. The Academy Award winning song “The Way You Look Tonight,” written by Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields for the 1936 Fred Astaire-Ginger Rogers movie: Swing Time, recorded in 1936 by Bing Crosby and his wife Dixie Lee Crosby accompanied by Victor Young & His Orchestra and found on the Bingling Box Set: Bing Crosby – Easy to Remember.

  2. “Thanks for the Memory,” the song that later became Bob Hope’s theme song for this radio and TV shows, was originally composed By Ralph Rainger and Leo Rubin for the 1938 movie: The Big Broadcast of 1938, for which it won the Academy Award. This version was sung by Hope and Crosby’s frequent Road pictures partner Dorothy Lamour and appears on her antic anthology: Queen of the Hollywood Islands.

  3. “Cheek to Cheek,” the Irving Berlin classic was introduced by Fred Astaire in the1935 movie: Top Hat, was nominated for Academy Award, and appears on the elder album: Fred Astaire – The Great American Songbook.

  4. “Ole Buttermilk Sky” was composed by Jeff Brooks and Hoagy Carmichael for the 1946 western starring Dana Andrews and Susan Hayward titled: Canyon Passage and was nominated for an Academy Award. It was recorded in 1946 by Kay Kyser and His Orchestra, featuring a very young Mike Douglas and The Campus Kids on Vocals, taken from the academical album: Kay Kyser – Best of the Big Bands.

  5. George & Ira Gershwin’s “They Can't Take That Away From Me,” which was nominated for an Academy Award after appearing in the 1937 movie Shall We Dance, waxed in 1956 for the lapidarial LP: The Swinging Guitar of Tal Farlow, featuring Eddie Costa on Piano and Vinnie Burke on Bass.

  6. “The Man That Got Away,” composed in 1953 by Harold Arlen and Ira Gershwin for the 1954 movie: A Star Is Born, which was nominated for an Academy Award, sung by Rosemary Clooney on her 1964 album: Thanks for Nothing, arranged and conducted by Bob Thompson, which was her last full-length LP project until she began recording again for Concord Records in 1977.

  7. “Swinging on a Star” was written by Jimmy Van Heusen and Johnny Burke and won the Academy Award after it was sung by Bing Crosby in the 1944 movie: Going My Way, and was performed here by Manny Albam & His Orchestra for the 1955 liberational LP: The Jazz Workshop, featuring Sol Schlinger on Baritone Sax, Joe Newman on Trumpet and Bob Brookmeyer on Valve Trombone, with Milt Hinton on Bass and Osie Johnson on Drums.

  8. Academy Award nominee “That Old Black Magic,” which was written by Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer for the 1942 movie: Star Spangled Rhythm, waxed in 1958 by Louis Prima and Keely Smith, found on the rigorous retrospective: Louis Prima – Complete Collectors Series.

  9. The Academy Award winning song “Secret Love,” composed by Sammy Fain and Paul Francis Webster for the 1953 movie: Calamity Jane, where it was introduced by Doris Day, sung here in 1964 by Barbara McNair by her vital LP: The Livin’ End.

  10. “How About You?” written by Burton Lane and Ralph Freed for the 1941 Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney movie: Babes on Broadway, which was nominated for an Academy Award, taken from the 1957 tour de force: How About Uke – Lyle Ritz Plays Jazz Ukulele, including Red Mitchell on Bass and Gene Estes on Drums.

  11. Another Oscar-nominated song, “This Time the Dream's on Me,” written by Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer for the 1941 movie: Blues in the Night, derived from the 1960 laryingistical LP: Tony Bennett Sings a String of Harold Arlen.

  12. “I've Got You Under My Skin,” the Academy Award nominee by Cole Porter from the 1936 MGM movie musical: Born to Dance, appearing on the 1998 scintillacious CD: Sinatraland by Patrick Williams and His Big Band, featuring Tom Scott on Tenor Sax and Chuck Berghofer on Bass.

  13. “The Superman Theme,” the Oscar-nominated score composed by John Williams for the 1978 movie, performed in an entirely a cappella version by Petra Haden on her concentrically eccentric CD: Petra Goes to the Movies.

  14. The eternal Academy Award winning song “Over the Rainbow” by Harold Arlen and E.Y. “Yip” Yarbug for the 1939 movie: Wizard of Oz, recorded in 1953 and included on the centurian CD: Art Tatum – Centennial Celebration.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge January 29, 2020 Birthdays

On this week’s radio show we once again celebrated the birthdays of just a handful of the fine musical artists who joined our planet during the jubilant month of January.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge show is broadcast every Wednesday, 5-6 pm Eastern Standard Time (2-3 pm on the West Coast and 10-11 GMT in Europe) at http://www.radiofairfax.org. Radio Fairfax also can be heard on Tune In Radio at tunein.com, and streamed on smartphones by downloading the Tunein app. It also can be streamed on Roku and Google TV at: http://tinyurl.com/3uqfsz9

Past shows are now available to listen to in their entirety at: https://www.mixcloud.com/Flashfriend/

  1. “Keko” recorded in 1929 by our Birthday Boy Andy Iona’s Novelty Four, found on the solarial CD: From Honolulu to Hollywood – Jazz, Blues & Popular Specialties Performed Hawaiian Style.

  2. “Tropical Swing,” recorded in 1936 and taken from the histological historical document by our January Natal Notable Bill Tapia, also titled Tropical Swing, featuring the song’s composer Gordon Beecher on vocal accompanied by Julia Nui’s Trio on Backing Vocals, Mr. Tapia on Guitar, Tommy Carter on Piano; Kirk Bradford on Steel Guitar; Henry Allen on Clarinet and Jake Carter on Bass.

  3. “Night Time Is the Right Time” waxed in 1937 by our Birthday Boy, The Honey Dripper himself, Roosevelt Sykes, accompanying himself on Piano, found on the copious compilation: The Prewar Blues Story – 1926-1943.

  4. “It Had to Be You,” the 1924 song composed by January Birthday Baby Isham Jones and Gus Kahn, performed by Martin Taylor on Guitar and David Grisman on mandolin, mandola and mandocello, from their stringish CD: Tone Poems II.

  5. “Blues Clair,” the song recorded in France in 1943 by our Natal Numinary and master guitarist, found on his righteous retrospective: The Best of Django Reinhardt, with Eugene Vees on Guitar, Jean Storne on Bass and Gaston Leonard on Drums.

  6. “Good Morning Heartache,” the 1946 song by Irene Higgenbotham, Ervin Drake and Dan Fisher, composed for our more-than-capable canary, Billie Holiday, Joe Springer on Piano, Gordon “Chris” Griffin on Trumpet; Joe Guy on Muted Trumpet; Bill Stegmeyer on Alto Sax; Hank Ross, Bernie Kaufman and Armand Camgros on Tenor Sax; Tiny Grimes on Guitar; John Simmons on Bass and our January Birthday Boy Sidney Catlett on Drums, found on the anthropomorphic anthology: Jazz Noire – Darktown Sleaze From the Mean Streets of 1940s L.A.

  7. “Popity Pop” sung in 1946 by our Natal Notable Slim Gaillard and his partner vocal crime and Bassist Bam Brown, included on the bulging box set: Laughing in Rhythm. Accompanied by Charlie Parker on Alto Sax, Jack McVea on Tenor Sax, Dizzy Gillespie on Trumpet, Zutty Singleton on Drums and Dodo Marmarosa on Piano

  8. This version of “Caravan” composed by Duke Ellington and our January Birthday Boy, trombonist Juan Tizol, was sung by Connie Evingson on her compact disc: Gypsy in My Soul, with help from the Parisota Hot Club, including Robb Henry and Bob Ekstrand on Guitars, Tony Balloff on Clarinet and Keith Boyles on Bass.

  9. “Blow, Champ, Blow” from the 1950 recording by our Birthday Boy Hot Lips Page and His Orchestra found on the historical CD: Jump for Joy! Featuring Mr. Page on Vocal and Trumpet and Vincent Bair-Bey on Alto Sax.

  10. “Midget” was waxed in 1953 by our Birthday Baby, the famed drummer Gene Krupa and his septet, which were Charlie Shavers on Trumpet, Bill Harris on Trombone, Ben Webster on Tenor Sax, Herb Ellis on Guitar, Teddy Wilson on Piano and Ray Brown on Bass, found on the Proper introduction: Up an’ Atom.

  11. The Ray Noble classic, “I Hadn't Anyone 'Til You” which was used in the 1950 Humphrey Bogart Film Noir movie: In a Lonely Place, recorded by the singer Mel Torme and the Mel-Tones in 1959 for the labial LP: Back in Town, arranged by our January Natal Notable Marty Paich, who also appears on Celeste, along with the sometime TV actor Jack Sheldon on Trumpet, Art Pepper on Alto Sax, Barney Kessel, Tommy Tedesco, Bobby Gibbons, Tony Rizzi, and Bill Pittman on Electric Guitars, Victor Feldman on Vibes, Joe Mondragon on Bass and Mel Lewis on Drums.

  12. “Them There Eyes,” the 1930 song by Maceo Pinkard, Doris Tauber and William Tracey, waxed in 1945 by Anita O’Day and drawn from her bulging box set: Young Anita, featuring our Birthday Boy Milt Raskin on Piano, Peggy Lee’s husband Dave Barbour on Guitar and Zutty Singleton on Drums.

  13. “I Can't Believe That You're in Love With Me,” the 1927 song by Jimmy McHugh and Clarence Gaskill, which was later sung by May Wynn in the 1954 movie: The Caine Mutiny, recorded in 1954 by Tony Bennett and taken from the jazzical combination under his name: Jazz, including our Birthday Boy Ed Shaughnessy on Drums along with Chuck Wayne on Electric Guitar Charles Panely on Trumpet & Caesar Demauro and David Schildkraut on Tenor and Alto Sax, Harvey Leonard on Piano and Claude Lombardi on Bass.

  14. “C'est Si Bon (It's So Good),” the 1947 song composed by Henri Betti and Andre Homez, with English Lyircs by Jimmy Seelen, recorded in 1953 by our Birthday Girl Eartha Kitt with Henri René and his Orchestra and found on her scintillacious CD: Miss Kitt, To You.

  15. “Heaven,” the 1959 field recordings by our January Birthday Boy Alan Lomax of “Wished I Was Sitting Down” by Fred McDowell and “I Wished I Was In Heaven” by Denise Gardner, Mattie Gardner, Ida Mae Towns, Lucille Powell & Fred McDowell drawn from the 2004 CD by the New Orleans group Tangle Eye titled: Alan Lomax's Southern Journey Remixed, with Scott Billington on Harmonica, Vic Shepherd on Slide Acoustic Guitar and David Farrell on Drums.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge January 22, 2020

On this week’s Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge radio show we celebrated the life and works of Jimmy Van Heusen, who contributed some of the most delightful tunes to grace the Mid-Century scene. Born on January 26, 1913 with the name Edward Chester Babcock, at age 16 he changed it to the name of the famous shirtmaker when he began performing on radio. His songs have appeared in over 180 movies -- four of them winning Oscars. He penned a total of more than 800 songs, 50 considered standards.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge show is broadcast every Wednesday, 5-6 pm Eastern Standard Time (2-3 pm on the West Coast and 10-11 GMT in Europe) at http://www.radiofairfax.org. Radio Fairfax also can be heard on Tune In Radio at tunein.com, and streamed on smartphones by downloading the Tunein app. It also can be streamed on Roku and Google TV at: http://tinyurl.com/3uqfsz9

Past shows are now available to listen to in their entirety at: https://www.mixcloud.com/Flashfriend/

  1. “Moonlight Becomes You” was written by Van Heusen and his frequent songwriting collaborator Johnny Burke for the 1942 movie: Road to Morocco, performed by Bing Crosby accompanied by John Scott Trotter & His Orchestra and taken from Der Bingles basking Box Set: Easy to Remember.

  2. “Darn That Dream,” with lyrics by Eddie DeLange, came from the 1933 Broadway musical: Swingin’ the Dream and this version was sung by Mildred Bailey with the Benny Goodman Orchestra, featuring Mr. Goodman on Clarinet, found on the tipsy and timely treasury titled: Mildred Bailey – Cocktail Hour Series.

  3. “Here's That Rainy Day,” was composed by Johnny Burke and Van Heusen in 1953 for the Broadway musical: Carnival in Flanders, and was waxed by David Grisman on Mandolin and Martin Taylor on Acoustic Guitar for their 1995 magnum opus: Tone Poems II.

  4. Another Burke and Van Heusen classic, “Swinging on a Star,” the Academy Award-winning song from the 1944 Bing Crosby movie: Going My Way, was found on the 1957 exuberant album: Joy Bryan Sings, with the Marty Paich Septet, including Mr. Paich on arrangements and Piano, sometime television actor Jack Sheldon on Trumpet, Bob Enevoldsen on Clarinet, Bass Clarinet and Trombone, Herb Geller on Clarinet and Alto Sax, Ronny Lang on Clarinet, Alto and Baritone Sax, Red Mitchell on Bass and Mel Lewis on Drums.

  5. “Oh, You Crazy Moon,” also by the team of Johnny Burke and Jimmy Van Heusen, was recorded in 1960 by Mel Torme with Russell Garcia’s Orchestra for his pendulous LP: Swingin’ on the Moon.

  6. “Boy's Night Out” was written by Van Heusen and lyricist Sammy Cahn for the 1962 Kim Novak and James Garner movie of the same name, and was recorded in 1963 by the master arranger and exotica composer Les Baxter for his honorific album: The Academy Award Winners.

  7. Dorothy Lamour and Fred MacMurray introduced this Burke and Van Heusen song titled: “It Could Happen to You” in the 1944 musical comedy movie: And The Angels Sing, and this version was waxed by the determinative Bob Dorough on Vocal and piano from his 1956 lubricious LP: Devil May Care, with Warren Fitzgerald on Trumpet, Jack Hitchcock on Vibes, Bill Takas on Bass and Jerry Segal on Drums, finally found on the righteous retrospective: The Devil’s Best Tunes – The Beatnik Scat of Bob Dorough.

  8. “I Thought About You,” the 1939 song by Johnny Mercer and Jimmy Van Heusen, recorded in 1957 by Ella Fitzgerald for her l’amourous LP: Like Someone in Love, featuring Stan Getz on Tenor Sax.

  9. “Call Me Irresponsible,” originally written by Jimmy Van Heusen and Sammy Cahn for Judy Garland, who sang it on her TV show, this version was recorded by Dinah Washington in 1964 and can be heard on her copious collection: The Best of the Roulette Years.

  10. “Come Dance With Me,” the 1959 song by Sammy Cahn and Van Heusen, recorded in Paris in 1959 for the eloquent LP: A Jazz Portrait of Frank Sinatra by the Oscar Peterson Trio, with Mr. Peterson on Piano, Ray Brown on String Bass, and Ed Thigpen on Drums.

  11. “Like Someone in Love,” also composed by Van Heusen and Burke for the 1944 movie: Belle of the Yukon, performed by Karrin Allyson on her somnolent CD: Daydream, with Kim Park on Alto Sax, Paul Smith on Piano, Danny Embrey on Guitar and Todd Strait on Percussion.

  12. “All My Tomorrows” was inked by Sammy Cahn and Jimmy Van Heusen for the 1959 Frank Sinatra movie: A Hole in the Head, and was sung by Tony Bennett on his 1965 aerodynamic album: If I Ruled the World – Songs for the Jet Set, arranged and conducted by Don Costa, accompanied here only by Ralph Sharon on Piano and Hal Gaylor on Bass.

  13. The 1945 song by Johnny Burke and Jimmy Van Heusen, “Aren’t You Glad You’re You,” performed by Lucy Ann Polk from her 1954 lucky LP: Lucy Ann Polk with Dave Pell, with Tony Rizzi on Guitar.

  14. “Come Fly With Me” was composed by Jimmy Van Heusen and Sammy Cahn for Frank Sinatra and in 1988 Shirley Horn put her stamp on it on her sumptuous CD: Close Enough for Love, singing and playing piano with the support of Buck Hill on Tenor Sax, Charles Ables on Bass and Steve Williams on Drums.

  15. “Polka Dots and Moonbeams,” the 1940 song by Jimmy Van Heusen and Johnny Burke that was Frank Sinatra’s first big hit with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra, featured on the non-standard 1988 CD: Cassandra Wilson Sings Standards.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge January 15, 2020

On this week’s Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge radio show we explored the rhythmagical and beatific music that hails from Africa – from the sands of the north to the vedt of the south, as well as music inspired by visions of that continent.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge show is broadcast every Wednesday, 5-6 pm Eastern Standard Time (2-3 pm on the West Coast and 10-11 GMT in Europe) at http://www.radiofairfax.org. Radio Fairfax also can be heard on Tune In Radio at tunein.com, and streamed on smartphones by downloading the Tunein app. It also can be streamed on Roku and Google TV at: http://tinyurl.com/3uqfsz9

Past shows are now available to listen to in their entirety at: https://www.mixcloud.com/Flashfriend/

  1. “Sing A'man” comes from the 1960s landmarkable LP: Mysterious Instinct (Akannaginnagi), led by the actor Brock Peters and Conga Drums Master Ray Barretto. Peters’ father was from Senegal. The other musicians were Chief Bey on Conga Drums; Al Leas on Flute; George Duvivier on Bass; and Sticks Evans on Tympani.

  2. “Conversation” is fortunately found on the 1957 admirable album by Les Baxter and his Orchestra and Chorus titled Skins!

  3. “Ju-Ju Man” was drawn with tongs from the 1960 lively LP: The Savage and the Sensuous Bongos by Don Ralke and His Orchestra.

  4. “Safari to Kenya” was crafted by the Japanese-American composer, arranger and conductor Tak Shindo and comes from his 1958 debut album: Mganga!

  5. “Sinovela” by the Soukous Stars, a group of all-star musicians from group from the Congo, was mindfully mined from the copacetic compilation: Feet – A Global Dance Party.

  6. “Watusi Ceremonial Dance” was delightfully derived from the 1950s recording with the lengthy title: Kirby Allan Presents…Chaino: Africana & Beyond! – Spellbinding Primitive Rhythms by Chaino, Percussion Genius of Africa.

  7. “Broska” was plangently performed by Manecas Costa from Senegal and appears on the cosmic collection: The Very Best of Africa/Volume 2.

  8. “Que Linda Va” was recorded in 1968 by Carlos “Patato” Valdez on Conga Drums and Percussion) and Eugenio “Totico” Arrango on Vocals and appears on their eponymous album: Patato & Totico.

  9. “Ominira” was performed by Benin singer Angelique Kidjo on her chromatical compact disc: Black Ivory Soul, and she co-composed it with the Brazilian composer Vinicius Cantuaria, who appears on acoustic guitar, with backing by Bernie Worrell on Organ, Michael Alibo on Electric Bass and Questlove on Drums, among others.

  10. “Africa, Havana, Paris” comes from the 1996 album by the Angolan musician Ricardo Lemvo and his band, Makina Loca, on their navigable album: Tata Masamba.

  11. “Djelimady Rumba” appears on the creative compact disc: Afrocubism, combining musicians from Cuba and Mali. The musicians include the song’s composer Djalimadi Tounkara on Electric Guitar.

  12. “Dabula Na Mutamulani” was performed by the Mozambique band: Yinguica and is included on the bent anthology: ARC Music 35th Anniversary 1976-2011.

  13. “Tew Ante Sew (“Please Stop What You Are Doing”), was waxed by the Ethiopian singer GiGi on her self-titled CD, featuring her husband Bill Laswell on Electric Guitar, Pharaoh Sanders on Soprano Sax, Thomas Gobena on Electric Bass and Karsh Kale on Tabla Drums.

  14. “Así Es La Vida (That’s Life)” appears on the Cuban Pianist Roberto Fonseca’s outstanding album: Yo, with Felipe Cabrera on Bass, Alex Kelly on Cello, Ramses Rodriguez on Drums, Baba Sissoko on African Percussion and Joel Hierrezuedo on Cuban Percussion.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge January 8, 2020

On this week’s show celebrated the birthday of my canonical wife, the beauteous and talented Elinor, who has blessed my existence with her love and showered my life with her beneficence for more than a dozen years now, and who was born on the Capricornish day of January 11.

Dr. Zarkov’s Tiki Lounge show is broadcast every Wednesday, 5-6 pm Eastern Standard Time (2-3 pm on the West Coast and 10-11 GMT in Europe) at http://www.radiofairfax.org. Radio Fairfax also can be heard on Tune In Radio at tunein.com, and streamed on smartphones by downloading the Tunein app. It also can be streamed on Roku and Google TV at: http://tinyurl.com/3uqfsz9

Past shows are now available to listen to in their entirety at: https://www.mixcloud.com/Flashfriend/

  1. “Makanani,” composed by Henry Machado Sr. and Helena Kalokuokamaile Salazar sung by Owana Ka’ohelelani Salazar on her 1986 recording titled Owana, with Alan Akaka on Steel Guitar and Al Ka’ai on Slack-Key Guitar.

  2. “The Way You Look Tonight,” written by Jerome Kern for the 1936 Fred Astaire-Ginger Rogers movie: Swing Time, sung here by Fred on his 1952 pedal nostalgia LP: Steppin’ Out – Astaire Sings, with Oscar Peterson on Piano, Charlie Shavers on Trumpet, Flip Phillips on Tenor Sax, Barney Kessel on Electric Guitar, Ray Brown on Bass and Alvin Stoller on Drums.

  3. “Bang Goes the Drum (And You’re in Love)” from Blossom Dearie’s 1957 loquacious LP: Give Him the Ooh-La-La, featuring Ms. Dearie on Vocal and Piano, Herb Ellis on Electric Guitar; Ray Brown on Bass; and Jo Jones on Drums.

  4. “The Squirrel,” composed and recorded in 1947 by the Pianist Tadd Dameron with Fats Navarro on Trumpet, Ernie Henry on Alto Sax, Charlie Rouse on Tenor Sax, Nelson Boyd on Bass and Shadow Wilson on Drums, taken from the Bulging Box Set: The Fats Navarro Story.

  5. “The Moon of Manakoora,” written by Frank Loesser and Alfred Newman for the 1937 Dorothy Lamour movie: The Hurricane (although she didn’t sing it in the movie), recorded by her in 1943 with Dick McIntyre & His Harmony Hawaiians and found of the sarong-wrapped CD: Dorothy Lamour -- Queen of the Hollywood Islands.

  6. “Three Little Words,” the 1930 song by Harry Ruby and Bert Kalmar recorded in 1947 by Mel Torme and included on his rapturous retrospective: Sounds of the 20th Century – Love Me or Leave Me, with the Dave Barbour Four, including Barbour, who was Peggy Lee’s husband, on Electric Guitar.

  7. “Murmullo” from the original Buena Vista Social Club Album, featuring the talents of Ibrahim Ferrer on Vocal, Ruben Gonzalez on Piano, Ry Cooder on Steel Guitar, Orlando “Cachaito” Lopez on Bass, Lazaro Villa on Congas, Joachim Cooder on Udu Drum and Alberto Valdes on Maracas.

  8. “Just Tell Me” by Toots and the Maytals from the six-CD set: Reggae – The Definitive Collection: Songs of Freedom.

  9. The Tom T. Hall classic composition: “I Love (Little Baby Ducks)” performed by The Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain on their sumptuous CD: Still Live, with D

Dr. Zarkov wrote:
It has been suggested by the site admin that I start combining playlists in one place instead of adding them separately which I will start doing from now on.

I approve! And, please, keep up the good effort.

I believe I have asked in the past...any chance you could release your show as a podcast? For me, new shows for subscribed podcasts show up in my feed. Of course, you are a regular as clockwork, so I know when you have a new show.

Unfortunately, when you do a podcast and incorporate music you have to go through a complicated process to pay royalties for the compositions and performances, including keeping track of your exact number of listeners. That is why the vast majority -- if not all -- podcasts are spoken word. Radio Fairfax is part of a public access operation paid for by cable TV companies in Northern Virginia. I pay $26 in annual dues and they take care of the royalties through an agreement with the music industry organization responsible for collecting that is similar to the agreements it has with public radio and military radio operations.

You also can stream my show anytime you wish at https://www.mixcloud.com/Flashfriend/

Mixcloud also takes care of the royalties and allows me to post my radio shows at no charge. Please don't ask me how they make money doing this because I haven't figured it out yet.

Thanks for listening,

Dr. Zarkov

[ Edited by: Dr. Zarkov 2019-12-11 16:14 ]

On 2019-12-11 16:13, Dr. Zarkov wrote:
Unfortunately, when you do a podcast and incorporate music you have to go through a complicated process to pay royalties for the compositions and performances, including keeping track of your exact number of listeners.

Thank you for the explanation!

What happened here? For some reason, it's not telling me the original post was updated.

[ Edited by: Scott McGerik 2020-02-26 17:29 ]

H
Hamo posted on Mon, Mar 16, 2020 11:17 PM

On 2020-02-25 19:08, Scott McGerik wrote:
What happened here? For some reason, it's not telling me the original post was updated.

I wondered the same thing. It looks like Dr. Zarkov is just updating the first entry, which doesn't bump the thread to the top of the forum.

Hey Doc, you should post each playlist as a new reply to this thread, that way we should see it easier while still keeping it in one place (as well as chronological order.)

Love your show. Usually listen to it on the weekends, I always forget on Wednesday. Your vocabulary and geography each week keeps me in the dictionary and the atlas. Thanks

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