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hey boutikis and everybody,

i'm digging on the new tiki quest mug


courtesy munktiki, boutiki, bigbrotiki and all the tikis

a seach of this site and the whole internet comes up blank. what do we know about the work of the artist that this mug is based on?

thanks, j$


[ Edited by: Johnny Dollar on 2004-08-09 06:01 ]

He's dead.

...well, that, and much too little is what we know. He has a brother somewhere up North.
I always loved his work, I had one palm Tiki like the ones in front of Sea and Jungle store, but it was so decrepit it fell apart. I loved his Tikis in front of The Royal Hawaiian before they were stolen...
An unsung hero of Tiki moderne.

bigbrotiki informed:

He's dead.
...well, that, and much too little is what we know.

And that, in a nutshell, is why its is so important to be asking questions about just about everything right now.

Johnny Dollar, that is not the first mug to be based on Bumatay. I only know this because page 66 of Tiki Quest shows a bug-eyed mug with the caption:

"OMC made this mug, which was based on the carvings of Andres Bumatay. It can be found with markings from The Islander and Hale Kahiki. Johnson Products offered this mug among its line of Tiki bar accessories." The author goes on to note that he has examples marked JPCo, Hala Kahaki, as well as unmarked.

The Book of Tiki, page 250, gives a little more info on Bumatay and shows some pics of his work. Sven writes that Bumatay was of Filipino heritage and that his tikis were available at the Sea and Jungle store.

Would anyone know where and when Johnson Products were sold? Direct to bars or retail also?

And, Boutiki, will the Tiki Quest mug be made available for sale to those of us who bought Tiki Quest hot off the presses and will never be near a Tiki Quest event?

On 2004-08-06 18:24, tikijackalope wrote:

Would anyone know where and when Johnson Products were sold? Direct to bars or retail also?

Johnson Products were based in Chicago in the 60s and 70s. They were wholesalers, like Oceanic Arts. Maybe they had an outlet in Chicago. They offered a wide variety of tropical decor, from little coconut monkeys and Tiki mugs to Witco fountains and thatched huts.

I got the Bumatay mug in the BOT at the Hala Kahiki in the 90s, my cocktail came in it and I simply bought it there.I believe the Islander mug came first, but I would guess an OMC designer just copied the style, just like the Witco fountain mug, from a Bumatay Tiki in a restaurant.

Bosko made a very nice Bumatay mug once, too, but Duke's takes the cake.

mahalo all! thx also tikijackalope for the "Bumatay" vs "Bumataty" spelling info...

I'm curious if anyone has any pictures of Bumatay carvings.
A Google search only brings up 2 items - and one is this thread.

I picked up an unusual wall-hanging wood carving today that appears very similar to the 'bug eyed' style. It looks, in fact, very similar to the mug found on Pg 9 on Tiki Quest and pg 250 in BOT.
(I'll post a pic asap.)
But, does anyone have any pics to which we can compare?

On 2004-08-22 20:00, the75stingray wrote:
I'm curious if anyone has any pictures of Bumatay carvings.
A Google search only brings up 2 items - and one is this thread.


Newspaper clipping of Andres Bumatay


Placemat (?) from The Reef based on the tiki above



These Bumatay tikis were eventually stolen from the Royal Hawaiian in Laguna Beach


"Slice of Pie" Tiki


BigBro's "Slice of Pie" diagram


Decent pictures of the Stockton Islander Bumatay tiki don't seem to exist, this one was enhanced by abstractiki


Islander menu


Islander Bumatay Mug


Kelbo's Bumatay (in the back of the photo)


Tiki Kaimuki's "Kapulapu" Bumatay inspired mug


Bumatay inspired (?) logo for The Tahitian

If any of these pics are mis-credited, please let me know and remove them.

MadDog - I think this is a great idea; to accumulate the various pictures of Bumatay and Bumatay-inspired tikis all in one place for easy viewing. Also, make sure to search TC using the spelling "Bumatai" as well as "Bumatay", as both are used.

Another interesting fact we learned back in 2005 was that many tikis attributed to Andy Bumatay were actually carved by his apprentice, Richard M. Ellis, who learned woodcarving from Bumatay in the 50s, and went on to carve hundreds of tikis and decorate many restaurants on his own. His style is similar enough to be indistinguishable from Bumatay's to this non-carver's eyes. The tiki at the Stockton Islander and the famous mug that was designed from it are attributed to Richard Ellis.

Here's the thread on the Latitude 20 in Las Vegas that elicited some really neat information from Richard Ellis' daughter, Annie Ellis:

http://www.tikicentral.com/viewtopic.php?topic=15398&forum=1&start=30

And here's some more info:

http://www.tikicentral.com/viewtopic.php?topic=4848&forum=2&vpost=240683

That being said, with the knowledge that some of these might be Richard Ellis tikis, here's a few more pictures:

:down: Bumatay-style tikis attributed to Richard Ellis by his daughter, from the Trade Winds in Oxnard, CA


:up: Richard Ellis actually carving the tiki in the first picture

:down: Richard Ellis also did the tikis for the Tonga Lei in Malibu, so this one is probably his as well:

:down: Even Milan Guanko did tikis that were reminiscent of Bumatay's style. Here's one from the "Whispering Lakes" apartments, near the Royal Tahitian in Ontario, CA:

...and the middle one here from the Kapu Kai in Cucamonga, CA that has a similar feel:

Vintage bowls with Bumatay-style feet that inspired Gecko's "Mt Bumatay" bowl:

#74 in this catalog:

In front of The Sea & Jungle store:

:down: The Polynesian Village apartments in Playa del Rey:

:down: The Kona Pali apartments, Granada Hills:

:down: Part of an antique store's stock in Philadelphia that probably came from either the Pub Tiki or Langerman's Luau.


[ Edited by: Sabu The Coconut Boy 2010-10-01 17:15 ]

B

Spotted on the the Big Island in 2000 and part of the inspiration for the Tiki Quest mug:

-Duke

MadDogMike,

I thought the Tikis at The Reef were carved by Charlie Rosencrans (who also did the the Tikis at the Royal Tahitian)?

Sabu,

Nice follow up.

Here are a few more Bumatay examples from The Book of Tiki, now in its 10th Anniversary year.

DC

On 2010-10-01 16:30, Dustycajun wrote:
I thought the Tikis at The Reef were carved by Charlie Rosencrans (who also did the the Tikis at the Royal Tahitian)?

I think Rosencrans is credited with carving tikis at the Reef, but bigbro's newspaper clipping clearly shows that Bumatay at least did the tiki out front who's image ended up on the placemat too. Probably a joint effort.

In the late 1950s, Bumatay carved tikis for the Hawaiian Garden House nursery in Long Beach. Here's an article from 1958 with two large examples of his craft:


It's interesting that the nursery's owner uses the Hawaiian word "aumakua" to describe his tikis, as "aumakua" was the word referring to the smaller carved images that Hawaiians would have in their homes, and not the large temple images similar to what Bumatay was carving. It almost sounds like in the early days of the tiki-movement the true Hawaiians didn't like the American choice of "tiki"and were trying out different monikers. I'm glad the word "tiki" stuck eventually. The examples above are absolutely beautiful. Wonder who ended up buying them.


[ Edited by: Sabu The Coconut Boy 2010-10-01 17:19 ]

Thanks for the input guys

On 2010-10-01 16:30, Dustycajun wrote:
MadDogMike,
I thought the Tikis at The Reef were carved by Charlie Rosencrans (who also did the the Tikis at the Royal Tahitian)?

Here is Sven's discussion about the Reef carvers.

DC, I don't know nuthin'! I'm just trying to consolidate info into one thread :D

is it just me? I've been trying to view these images for a day.... Tim?

G
GROG posted on Fri, Oct 8, 2010 11:17 AM

Does that mean you forgot your glasses, or the images don't show up on your computer?

The images show up fine on GROG' computer.


GROG
GROG miss Tiki-Kate

[ Edited by: GROG 2010-10-08 11:18 ]

tikitikitom (shipwreck lounge burning man) says he's got 5 Bumatay carvings. That's what he said to me. I'll believe it when I see it but not sure I can make it to his decomp party this Sunday in S.F. Somebody needs to get over there.
and good luck trying to buy one, I already tried.

[ Edited by: Jungle Trader 2010-10-08 16:47 ]

It's wild thinking of how much info on Bumatay has come out of the woodworks in the last 6 years (not that we know everything, mind you.) The beginning of the thread basically has his style as an unknown. I hear the name Bumatay now, and I think of one of legendary "big-time" carvers of the day. This could be because of the mass produced mugs attributed to him, but he did have a cool unique style. I love when old threads like this come back into the limelight.

On 2010-10-01 17:03, Sabu The Coconut Boy wrote:

...It's interesting that the nursery's owner uses the Hawaiian word "aumakua" to describe his tikis, as "aumakua" was the word referring to the smaller carved images that Hawaiians would have in their homes, and not the large temple images similar to what Bumatay was carving. It almost sounds like in the early days of the tiki-movement the true Hawaiians didn't like the American choice of "tiki"and were trying out different monikers. I'm glad the word "tiki" stuck eventually...

Yeah, we could have ended up as Aumakua Central! :lol:

T

I love this thread! I got this Bumatay mug several years ago at a junk shop in Sebastopol CA and knew nothing about it. Tiki Central is so great at helping with research on any Tiki related subject. Thank you Tiki Central!

Recently purchased this vintage large 12" Bumatay style ceramic tiki bank. He's very similar to the one that Bumatay is carving in the newspaper clipping in this post minus the headdress. I'm not sure of his origins and wonder if he was sold at Sea & Jungle imports? Anybody know anything about this bank?

Just popped up on another TC thread and thought it should go here:

On 2015-07-19 00:47, akjefferson wrote:

Andy Bumatay? Bumatay is a Filipino name it is Andy's fathers mothers maiden name. His fathers birth name was Bacilio Narte, he changed his last name to Bumatay and left the Philippines, and settled in Hawaii, where he married my fathers mother, she was full-blooded Hawaiian and they had five children. Andy was the youngest of two brothers and two sisters. His middle name is Kanuha which is his mothers family name and he was born in Kona, Hawaii. The news clipping dated on March 4, 1964 was taken 24 days before I was born. My name is Andrea Kanuha Bumatay. I came across this website a few days ago and was extremely surprised to learn that my fathers carvings are valued by so many. Its the first time I had ever seen the clippings. I was born and raised in Seattle Washington. My dad loved the Evergreen State, he bought a home and settled there, it is also his final resting place. While I was growing-up my dad was always carving something I didn't pay much attention to where his tiki's were going, or who they were going too. When I was around four years old I remember going to Hawaii and seeing my dads tiki's displayed at a popular park, they seemed to be very tall and people were taking pictures with their families standing by the tiki's but my memory is vague. My father worked for Todd's shipyard for as long as I can remember until his retirement in 1996. He was 64 when he died. I am the oldest of four kids. My parents divorced when I was three, my dad moved back to Hawaii and then he sent for my sister and I, I was about four then. We didn't stay long because we missed our mom, so we moved back to Washington. He married a Filipino woman, my stepmom her name is Magdalena when I was eight and they had two sons. I was close to my dad he was well respected, and was the type that you didn't mess with. Never in my life did I disrespect my father, he was very strict with my sister and me, she was a year younger then I. He loved playing Hawaiian music, he had his own band that played at a Hawaiian night club not far from our house, it was called "Golden Doors", this is when I was about five or six. One time he didn't have a babysitter for my sister and me, so he brought us back stage and I remember singing "Jeremiah was a bullfrog" in front of everyone. Every evening before dinner, if the weather was nice he sat on the porch and played his ukelele or his guitar singing Hawaiian songs. Bumatay is the original spelling of our last name and Bumatai is my cousins entertainment name, his name is Andy and he was a stand up comedian in Waikiki in the 80s & stared in a comedy show called "All in the Ohana in the late 80s. I hope this gives you a little idea about who he was...

Andrea K Bumatay- Jefferson
[email protected]

Buzzy Out!

I hope she is talking about the same Andres Bumatay - there are others with that name:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andy_Bumatai

It seems strange that, while Tiki carver Andres Bumatay was most active and prolific in Southern California, the place is not mentioned in the bio. Meanwhile Hawaii and Washington state are cited as his home - but next to no Bumatay Tikis have been documented in the those states.

The only explanation I have is that Andrea at first was not born, and then too young to remember the California Tiki craze, and that as the fad was waning, Andres/Andy moved away from SoCal, and reduced his Tiki output.

But there were so many Tiki apartment complexes around Seattle and Tacoma, one would assume that he would have gotten involved with at least 1 or 2 projects up there, many of which were partially supplied by Oceanic Arts, who knew Richard Ellis and Bumatay.

But maybe this bio explains why he disappeared and was never heard of :)

On 2015-07-19 10:23, bigbrotiki wrote:
I hope she is talking about the same Andres Bumatay - there are others with that name:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andy_Bumatai

It seems strange that, while Tiki carver Andres Bumatay was most active and prolific in Southern California, the place is not mentioned in the bio. Meanwhile Hawaii and Washington state are cited as his home - but next to no Bumatay Tikis have been documented in the those states.

The only explanation I have is that Andrea at first was not born, and then too young to remember the California Tiki craze, and that as the fad was waning, Andres/Andy moved away from SoCal, and reduced his Tiki output.

But there were so many Tiki apartment complexes around Seattle and Tacoma, one would assume that he would have gotten involved with at least 1 or 2 projects up there, many of which were partially supplied by Oceanic Arts, who knew Richard Ellis and Bumatay.

But maybe this bio explains why he disappeared and was never heard of :)

I stumbled across this website when I googled "Andres Bumatay", to find my brothers obituary to print a picture, his name was Andres Bumatay Jr., he died in 2010 and he is buried next to my dad and they share a headstone together. So, it is definitely by accident that I found Tiki Central. You can trust that this is absolutely a surprise out of no where to me. I had no idea that my dads tiki's have come this far in time. I looked at the blogs all day and all night, and when I looked at the newspaper clippings, it touched my heart and it immediately brought tears to my eyes, I sighed and said, it is my dad. He always rolled his pants tight at his boot collar or cut his pants to that length, he also cut the arms and around the neck of his t-shirts and sweatshirts. I asked my aunt questions about my dad today, she told me that my dad carved tiki's in California before I was born, when he was a bachelor. My father left Hawaii and went to California where he met my uncles from om my moms side, and he became like a brother to them. They brought my dad to Washington to where my uncles were originally from, he met my mom, and they were married. My aunt told me that his carvings were unique, and some people from California paid for his trip to go back to California to carve some tiki's for there business. My aunt also said that my dad belonged to a tiki club and his carvings were in shows and many people wanted his carvings, and that was how he made his living, until he married my mom, settled down, had my sister and me, and worked a nine to five job and was at the same job until his retirement. My dad carved tiki's on his spare time, he had many talents, he was a carpenter, he was always building onto our house, he collected and restored classic cars, he made some of our furniture; bunk beds, dressers, and reupholstered our living room furniture. He carved a tiki for my sister and me when I was 4 and it's stored with the family assets, with my step mom. The carving was about four or four and a feet tall. It is similar to all of his work but the carving had two round like, end tables or shelves, its kind of like the tiki is holding two round trays, one on top of the other. The top table was mine and the bottom one was my sisters. The mouth was wide, rectangular, and carved inward and your were able to put little things like jewelry or pencils etc... (this is the best I can do to describe it) and it stood on the side of our bunk beds. My thoughts are that my dad didn't talk about this part of his life because I was too young and it might of reminded him of my mom, she was his first love, and he loved her until the day he died. He did carve two tiki's for the Hawaiian night club that he and his band played music at, and a few other places, it was so long ago. He gave carvings as gifts to our relatives on a special occasion. One of my favorite carvings, that hung on the wall was a head and shoulder profile of a beautiful Hawaiian girl, she had long hair with a plumeria flower on the side of her head by her ear, and on her bare skin she wore a flower lei. My dad gave it to my Uncle and his wife as a wedding present for their brand new home. I will work on tracking down some of my dads carvings and hopefully, I can take pictures and/or get pictures to share with you. It will take some time and I wouldn't be able to begin this right away because my step mom lives in Seattle, she's really old school she doesn't use computers or smart phones and I live three hours north of Seattle, 18 mile south of the Canadian boarder. I am happy to share memories of my father... FYI, there are three Andy Bumatay's in my family, my dad, my brother and my 1st cousin who is a stand up comedian entertainer In Waikiki.

Aloha & Mahalo

Andrea Bumatay-Jefferson
[email protected]

Ha! Thank You so much Andrea for sharing and explaining further! Now it all begins to make sense. So Andi Bumatai the Hawaiian comedian IS related to Andres Bumatay!

Your dad's story is a great example how there are artistic talents slumbering in many of us: He definitely had a unique carving style that set his Tikis apart from all the others made at that time. It now seems that before and after his work in California, he mostly used his talent for private, personal occasions.

If you "personal message" me your address here on Tiki Central, I will be happy to send you my first book, the Book of Tiki, that has a little page about him in it. Published in 2000, it sparked the interest in his work and person, and in general in American Tiki as a veritable art form.

It seems that while here in L.A., he worked sometimes together with Richard Ellis, a carver and stuntman. Both of their styles intermingled a bit. They are said to have carved the poles for the Polynesian Village apartments in Playa del Rey, the Kona Kai Apts in Rosemead and the Kona Pali Apts in Granada Hills (all L.A.)

I really like the variety of concepts and forms that they used on those poles, here is a series of photos I took over the years ( the Polynesian Village Apts have been razed since):

Polynesian Village Apts:


(Vintage photos)

Kona Kai Apts:

Kona Pali Apts:

These carvings perfectly unite the elements of American Tiki style: Modernism, cartoony, and original Polynesian influences come together in a new art form! :)

[ Edited by: bigbrotiki 2015-07-20 09:15 ]

T

Andrea and Sven, this has really caught my interest, but unless Andy Bumatay changed his carving style the Washington apt tikis sure don't look like the ones he did in Cali. But in 2011 there was a craigslist ad up here for an 8 foot cedar tiki said to be 50 years old that was found in Burien WA that does remind me of of the Cali style. (they said it was made by the famous Hawaiian carver Weiwiuli, but this "famous" carver doesn't even seem to exist on the web)

But the reference to the Golden Door reminded me of Tani and the South Sea Islanders,

whose group performed there for nearly 20 years. Andrea is it possible your father performed with them? And could he be one of these men? (sorry for the bad photo quality)


the first 3 pictures were in taken in the lounge of the Golden Door, they did 2 shows a night on weekends the first in the restaurant the late show in the lounge. The last (blurry) pic was at Tani's home in... Burien! (and she's been selling her stuff for awhile, don't know for how long though)

Lastly, there is this shot added because of the huge mask,from one of their shows, that looks a bit like Bumatay's style. (kinda,sorta,maybe)

aloha, tikicoma

The top carving looks SO MUCH like a Bumatay! What happened to it? I want eeet! :wink:

Regarding the large Tiki mask at the end, I was reminded that Disney prop makers fashioned a Tiki for "Honey We Shrunk Ourselves" (1997) that was clearly based on a Bumatay:

Sven I wanted it too! But not for $795.00. Was no longer listed after awhile, guess someone made them an offer they liked.

Amazing...

As I am processing all of this, I see how the Hawaiian night club and the tiki bar scene in California inspired him as a musician, to sing and have his own band. It influenced him to later on, form his own family band. He sent me to bass guitar & guitar lessons, he sent my sister to drum lessons and sent both of us to hula lessons. My step mom had a beautiful voice she could harmonize to any song. Her and my dad sang perfect together, she also played the electric organ. He threw a few Luau's, he sold tickets and had a group of family members cater Hawaiian food. He decorated the Luau very similar to the pictures of the tiki bars & the Hawaiian floor show on your post and a few others, complete with a live band & dancing, the main event was a Hawaiian floor show complete with hula dancers, Tahitian dancers and men's fire dancers. My father had a collection of Lava rocks from Hawaii that he used to Kalua the pig for the Luau. Although, he didn't talk about carving tiki's in California, he lived his experiences with us...

Aloha & Mahalo

Andrea Bumatay-Jefferson
[email protected]

Love this thread :) Just being a fly on the wall as history unfolds

[ Edited by: MadDogMike 2015-07-21 09:53 ]

S

Really loving this thread.....I'm a big fan of the Bumatay style!

G

Andrea, so glad you discovered Tiki Central and are sharing your stories here as well as discovering things about your dad that you didn't know. That's happened a number of times here before and it's so rewarding to see family members find that the creative work of their ancestors isn't forgotten, but is actually appreciated and highly valued by a good number of people here. We all truly hope you find and photograph some of your father's Tiki carvings and share them here with us. But even if you don't find anything worth sharing here, it's still great that you were able to connect with your father's past on this message forum.

Does this remind anyone of the great Volcano restaurant thread that really came to life after the daughter of the owner stumbled on TC because of some vague references to the Volcano?? She was able to share a wealth of great photos and memorabilia here as well as discover more about her Dad's work along with the rest of us. Here's hoping that happens here with Andres Bumatay's work (which is one of my all-time faves)! One can dream... :)

[img]https://tikicentral.com/uploads/80116/56756680.jpg[/img

Here is a picture of my father; Andres Bumatay, He just arrived from the Philippines to Hong Kong. (picture taken in the Hong Kong airport in 1995.

Great, thanks for the pic! Looking forward to more! Did you ever get the copy of the Book of Tiki that I sent you?

G
GROG posted on Mon, Dec 21, 2015 11:32 PM

Thanks Andrea. This thread has now become muy AWESOME.

On 2015-12-21 12:07, bigbrotiki wrote:
Great, thanks for the pic! Looking forward to more! Did you ever get the copy of the Book of Tiki that I sent you?

Yes, I did thank you very much. I love the book! It's beautiful, very well made.

Andrea, since there's not a "LIKE" button here:

Glad you have it and love it :) There are many more who do, and now appreciate Andres' work. The mystery how he could have been so prolific as an artist/carver and then dropped it all (almost all) is intriguing.

Sven

I am so happy this thread made it to the top 10. I read every page and enjoyed it very much. Thank you all for the photos and giving this family some joy. Wendy

Wow! I think it is one of his tiki's, because we didn't live far from Burien, Washington. We often ate at restaurants and did our shopping at Fred Meyers and other places in the area. My daughters went to a hula school in Burien, about 12 years ago. It makes perfect sense because he did most of his work 50 years ago, right around the time I was born. He moved to Seattle days after, the news paper clipping of him carving a tiki was taken, dated on March 4, 1964 24 days be for I was born (March 28, 1964). My dads band played at a Hawaiian night club called Golden Doors, which had two of his tiki's on the side of the doors, my memory is vague, they could of been on the front of the doors.

Aloha and Maholo

Andrea

S

I was in the U.S. last year when this thread was bumped and i really enjoyed reading it. One of the more recent posts by Sven showed a carving that i fell in love with and thought would make a great mug.
It's taken nearly a year to get around to it, and it is still not completely finished, but here is my mug version of one of the carvings found at the Kona Pali apartments.

The original pic Sven posted alongside my carving which a mold was made from.

And the first six mugs poured and bisque fired.

There is more information about this mug and what i called it in my thread. Andrea, i hope i did your dad's (or Richard Ellis's) work justice.

Great idea to keep it "cubist", non-round. It is uncanny how "Tiki Revival" this Tiki seems, all the while it was designed in 1963!

TM

Got to say, very impressive!

Earlier this month I was lucky enough to pick-up this Bumatay hobbyist mug. Beside it is a statue version I found at a thrift store about a half a year ago.

Looking at them made me wonder... did Bumatay carve the Tiki Tops tiki?

The earliest dated photo I found was from 1959 and Andy, born in Dec 1931 could have been around 26 when it was up making it possible he was carving professionally on the islands before he carved in the early '60's in California.

(I know now that Bumatay didn't carve the Tiki Tops tiki but a man named August Paul Jordan... it collapsed from termite damage in 1966)

A number of things about this tiki reminded me of his carvings.
The double v's on the forehead. (Kona Pali and possible Seattles Golden Door tikis)

A squatting posture (not so unusual) and importantly, the abbreviated stubby snouts. (seen here in the Royal Hawaiian and Kelbos tikis,

And on some a rounded or balloon like body or mitten like hands. (from the BOT and the Reef...along with the Kelbo/mug designs.)

If I remember right he was from the Big Island but ambition my have driven him to the big time... Oahu!

Thanks for hearing me out.
aloha, tikicoma

[ Edited by: tikicoma 2020-01-16 17:33 ]

I completely concur with this realization, kudos to Coma for seeing this! :)

T

Well hell, while looking over Portland threads I noticed something I posted about a carving outside the Kon Tiki there possibly being carved by Mike McVay (he didn't recognize it) then I thought that looks like a Bumatay! Judge for yourself...

You know it looks just like the mug!

[ Edited by: tikicoma 2017-01-10 21:30 ]

[ Edited by: tikicoma 2017-01-10 23:47 ]

I found this old newspaper article from Ohio of all places with a big Bumatay featured at Shilitto's department store in Cincinnati.


DC

My Bumatay Tiki. Glad to have scored it a few years ago.

Screen Shot 2020-06-08 at 12.34.09 PM

After years of searching I have found just one exterior photo of the Golden Door restaurant in Seattle...and it's a grainy one at that. But you can make out two tikis which Andrea mentioned that had been carved by her father.

[ Edited by tikicoma on 2022-03-17 21:23:26 ]

[ Edited by tikicoma on 2022-03-19 15:42:11 ]

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