Welcome to the Tiki Central 2.0 Beta. Read the announcement
Celebrating classic and modern Polynesian Pop

Pages: 1 18 replies

Name:The Bamboo Club
Type:bar
Street:
City:Long Beach
State:CA
Zip:
country:USA
Phone:
Status:Open

Description:
Its Good Trust Me!

[ Edited by: revbambooben 2019-04-16 07:27 ]

Is it possible Super Ting Tong is the same as the mysterious "no name" tiki bar set to open in Long Beach?

https://lbpost.com/life/food/eastside-tiki-bar-tidal-bay-stache/

Surely the LB area can't be lucky enough to have two new tiki bars designed by the Right Reverend opening in the near future?

H
Hamo posted on Wed, Feb 13, 2019 6:17 PM

A co-worker (and former Californian) sent me that link today. I really like this analogy:

The tiki bar is not an attempt at re-creating the South Pacific more than it was the very American ideal of bringing island-centric auras onto our nation’s soil. Think Disneyland’s romanticization of royalty but apply it to island living: A tiki bar let people escape without having to, well, actually get on a boat in the 1930s and travel to the South Pacific or Hawaii or…

I'll be in the Anaheim area in early April, so hopefully the place will be open and I can find time for a visit.

H
Hamo posted on Wed, Feb 13, 2019 6:34 PM

Oh, and if they're having trouble naming the place, maybe they should consult the Tiki Bar Name Generator for inspiration.

https://www.hanttula.com/exhibits/tiki-bar-name-generator/

Tahitian Bungalow
Lono's Grotto
Heyerdahl's Cove
Tonga Tropics
The Royal Mainlander's Club
The Aloha Shores
Krakatoa Hula House
Outrigger Harbor
The Lana'i Hideaway
The Tabu Grove

C

Assuming that the Ting Tong is the same as the bar from the article, this is pretty exciting. With Don's now gone from Huntington Beach, I'm thrilled beyond thrilled to have a bar going "full tiki" just a few blocks from home. I stopped on my way to work this morning and took a look at their progress, which includes new bamboo out front. Peeking in the window, I could also see some cool stuff taking shape inside.

Nice to hear Ben gets to work AT HOME, once in a while!

Grunion Gazette (Long Beach, CA newspaper) article

Grunion Gazette: Tiki Bar Opens On East Anaheim Street

C

Seems like everything is ready for the grand opening. Lookin' good!

C

This time with new picture ...

A

If Tidal Bay is now the Bamboo Club, then what is Super Ting Tong?

H
Hamo posted on Wed, Mar 13, 2019 9:41 PM

After a little instagram sleuthing, I’ve concluded that Super Ting Tong and The Bamboo Club are one and the same.

Ben’s post here, where he talks about Super Ting Tong, includes pictures of the exterior that match with the exterior of the building in the picture c-monkey posted above.

H
Hamo posted on Wed, Apr 17, 2019 10:37 PM

Thanks for updating the post with the name, Ben. I see Adrian just released a podcast about the Bamboo Club featuring you; can’t wait to listen to it. I visited the day after your mug release party and will post pictures soon.

H
Hamo posted on Wed, May 1, 2019 8:50 PM

Here are some pics from my stop at The Bamboo Club the evening of Sunday, April 7, 2019.

It's a great space. Drinks were good. The vibe is different from most other tiki places I've been; it has a neighborhood/"dive" bar feel, and from my seat at the bar I could tell that most people were ordering beer or well drinks rather that the tropical ones. But the staff was great, and Ben and the other artists did a great job on decor, so I recommend a trip.

S
santa posted on Sun, May 5, 2019 11:56 AM

We went recently Sunday night and enjoyed it. Very low key. Reminded me a bit Of purple orchid el segundo.

The Long Beach Post gave the food at the Bamboo Club are very good review.
https://lbpost.com/life/food/melissa-ortizs-new-tiki-bar-menu-is-elevating-long-beachs-food-scene/

Melissa Ortiz’s new Tiki bar menu is elevating Long Beach’s food scene

Have you tried the food at Bamboo Club? It’s a question that’s being texted and whispered a lot across Long Beach lately, ever since the city’s new Tiki dive bar launched a chef-driven, all-day menu a few weeks ago.

It’s been asked of me incredulously, as if it’s hard to believe that our favorite 4th Street bartenders would now find themselves working at a place that serves affordable just-shucked Baja oysters with a lacto-fermented radish mignonette.

Another time, it was spoken excitedly, more an invitation than a question, as if I hadn’t already been binging at the Bamboo Club multiple weeknights in a row, downing classic Tiki cocktails in its dim interior and developing unhealthy cravings for the Thai tea-brined fried chicken sandwich (with that green papaya slaw).

Have you tried the food at Bamboo Club yet? The question is even being asked around Los Angeles, the city that scoffs at our small-fry dining scene, but can’t help but be curious when one of their own defects.

For the last few years, Bamboo Club Executive Chef Melissa Ortiz, the new menu’s mastermind, worked as the right hand to James Beard award-winning chef Michael Cimarusti, first as a contractor at Best Girl inside the Ace Hotel and later running the kitchen at his casual seafood restaurant, Connie & Ted’s. (His fine dining outfit, Providence, charges upwards of $200 per multi-course meal). During her time at Connie & Ted’s, Executive Chef Sam Baxter became an invaluable mentor to Ortiz, passing along Cimarusti’s dedication and strategic approach to culinary excellence.

“Chef Sam works like no other chef I’ve ever worked for in my life, and it all comes from chef Michael,” Ortiz says. “They always lead by example. They both equally taught me so much, and I want to pass that down to my cooks in Long Beach.”

Ortiz is an Army veteran with over a decade of experience in experimental fine dining. The Orange County native fell into culinary school—and moved to Long Beach—after returning from duty over a decade ago, but she didn’t immediately explore the city or try working here. Instead, with an incisive palate across a variety of cuisines, an obsessive need for balance and an expectation of consistency, she staged at Michelin-starred Melisse, became executive chef at the late Little Sparrow in Santa Ana and at one point ran the kitchen at the corporate headquarters of Snapchat.

She left Connie & Ted’s earlier this year because she was planning to deploy to Afghanistan, but during the long government shutdown, paperwork got backed up so she started doing fermentation-focused pop-ups around Long Beach with her best chef friend Remy Bisharat under the name Pyru After Dark. The pop-ups were met with mixed reactions, providing an important introduction to the city’s low-key food culture and giving her a crash course in how still-in-training-wheels both local chefs and local diners are. (She says she was unaware that Piru is a South L.A. Bloods gang or that Pyru’s first host, Sweet Dixie Kitchen, had a little PR disaster once upon a time called Popeyesgate.)

Other local opportunities presented themselves and since the beginning of the year Ortiz has been getting more involved in Long Beach’s restaurant scene: she consults with Rose Park Roasters on the food at their downtown location and recently wrote a seasonal dinner menu at Berlin. But it’s the dozen-or-so dishes she crafted to fit the vibe at Bamboo Club that has become Ortiz’s passion project over the last few months. It’s the first time Ortiz has created a menu by and for Long Beach in the 11 years she’s lived here.

“It was a challenge to make my food approachable—to simplify my ideas into bar food,” she says, noting that reducing quality was never an option. “All I knew is that I didn’t want to do the cliché Tiki bar menu. Long Beach deserves better.”

Ortiz built the menu organically, taking inspiration from the city’s history and diversity just as she began discovering it herself. When she went to the iconic Long Beach bar Joe Jost’s for the first time in March, she took note of the pickled eggs and pretzels they’ve served since opening nearly 100 years ago, then went home to make her own Japanese-inspired version. Finding Long Beach lacking in decent late-night grub, she fashioned a classic 6-ounce chuck-blend burger, cooked medium rare and oozing with caramelized onions, house-made Thousand Island dressing and pickles from her personal collection ($10 regular price, $7 happy hour). Recognizing the city’s strong vegan mafia, she made a Beyond Meat version to match.

A coconut shrimp toast drizzled in tamarind glaze—inspired by a savory pain perdu she had while cooking in the south of France—almost got axed from the menu after Eater declared that shrimp toast was “having a moment” in L.A. and she was worried about people thinking she was trying to be “on trend.” She kept it on only after being convinced that few in Long Beach had ever heard of shrimp toast, a fact verified after confused customers had to have it explained to them as “like Texas toast covered in shrimp paste.”

“It feels good to cook and for people to just enjoy it with no pretention,” she says.

And people are definitely enjoying; permeating the Bamboo Club is a kind of lightly themed neighborhood-bar energy. On a recent evening, less than a week after Bamboo Club’s menu launch, a man came in and ordered the Thai tea-brined fried chicken sandwich, proudly proclaiming it to be his third one in as many days. The next time he came in, I watched as he saddled up to the bar, asked Ortiz what the daily special was and ordered it sight unseen. A plate of fried smelt emerged, covered in a fermented Fresno and pineapple hot glaze with a side of yuzu-kosho ranch. He dipped each one, then popped the fish whole into his mouth, licking his fingers like he was devouring a plate of wings.

There’s more to come too, like house-made Spam, mango sticky rice for dessert and whatever else Ortiz and her growing team of sharp, local cooks feel like experimenting with. This Sunday, to celebrate the opening of the themed-and-thatched back patio, Ortiz is planning to cook a feast fit for a luau. She ordered a 90-pound pig, which she will wrap in banana leaves and cook on hot rocks in the traditional Polynesian style.

“I just want to make good food in a city that I live in,” Ortiz says, beaming.

On 2019-05-23 10:43, tikilongbeach wrote:
The Long Beach Post gave the food at the Bamboo Club are very good review.
https://lbpost.com/life/food/melissa-ortizs-new-tiki-bar-menu-is-elevating-long-beachs-food-scene/

Melissa Ortiz’s new Tiki bar menu is elevating Long Beach’s food scene

Have you tried the food at Bamboo Club? It’s a question that’s being texted and whispered a lot across Long Beach lately, ever since the city’s new Tiki dive bar launched a chef-driven, all-day menu a few weeks ago.

It’s been asked of me incredulously, as if it’s hard to believe that our favorite 4th Street bartenders would now find themselves working at a place that serves affordable just-shucked Baja oysters with a lacto-fermented radish mignonette.

Another time, it was spoken excitedly, more an invitation than a question, as if I hadn’t already been binging at the Bamboo Club multiple weeknights in a row, downing classic Tiki cocktails in its dim interior and developing unhealthy cravings for the Thai tea-brined fried chicken sandwich (with that green papaya slaw).

Have you tried the food at Bamboo Club yet? The question is even being asked around Los Angeles, the city that scoffs at our small-fry dining scene, but can’t help but be curious when one of their own defects.

For the last few years, Bamboo Club Executive Chef Melissa Ortiz, the new menu’s mastermind, worked as the right hand to James Beard award-winning chef Michael Cimarusti, first as a contractor at Best Girl inside the Ace Hotel and later running the kitchen at his casual seafood restaurant, Connie & Ted’s. (His fine dining outfit, Providence, charges upwards of $200 per multi-course meal). During her time at Connie & Ted’s, Executive Chef Sam Baxter became an invaluable mentor to Ortiz, passing along Cimarusti’s dedication and strategic approach to culinary excellence.

“Chef Sam works like no other chef I’ve ever worked for in my life, and it all comes from chef Michael,” Ortiz says. “They always lead by example. They both equally taught me so much, and I want to pass that down to my cooks in Long Beach.”

Ortiz is an Army veteran with over a decade of experience in experimental fine dining. The Orange County native fell into culinary school—and moved to Long Beach—after returning from duty over a decade ago, but she didn’t immediately explore the city or try working here. Instead, with an incisive palate across a variety of cuisines, an obsessive need for balance and an expectation of consistency, she staged at Michelin-starred Melisse, became executive chef at the late Little Sparrow in Santa Ana and at one point ran the kitchen at the corporate headquarters of Snapchat.

She left Connie & Ted’s earlier this year because she was planning to deploy to Afghanistan, but during the long government shutdown, paperwork got backed up so she started doing fermentation-focused pop-ups around Long Beach with her best chef friend Remy Bisharat under the name Pyru After Dark. The pop-ups were met with mixed reactions, providing an important introduction to the city’s low-key food culture and giving her a crash course in how still-in-training-wheels both local chefs and local diners are. (She says she was unaware that Piru is a South L.A. Bloods gang or that Pyru’s first host, Sweet Dixie Kitchen, had a little PR disaster once upon a time called Popeyesgate.)

Other local opportunities presented themselves and since the beginning of the year Ortiz has been getting more involved in Long Beach’s restaurant scene: she consults with Rose Park Roasters on the food at their downtown location and recently wrote a seasonal dinner menu at Berlin. But it’s the dozen-or-so dishes she crafted to fit the vibe at Bamboo Club that has become Ortiz’s passion project over the last few months. It’s the first time Ortiz has created a menu by and for Long Beach in the 11 years she’s lived here.

“It was a challenge to make my food approachable—to simplify my ideas into bar food,” she says, noting that reducing quality was never an option. “All I knew is that I didn’t want to do the cliché Tiki bar menu. Long Beach deserves better.”

Ortiz built the menu organically, taking inspiration from the city’s history and diversity just as she began discovering it herself. When she went to the iconic Long Beach bar Joe Jost’s for the first time in March, she took note of the pickled eggs and pretzels they’ve served since opening nearly 100 years ago, then went home to make her own Japanese-inspired version. Finding Long Beach lacking in decent late-night grub, she fashioned a classic 6-ounce chuck-blend burger, cooked medium rare and oozing with caramelized onions, house-made Thousand Island dressing and pickles from her personal collection ($10 regular price, $7 happy hour). Recognizing the city’s strong vegan mafia, she made a Beyond Meat version to match.

A coconut shrimp toast drizzled in tamarind glaze—inspired by a savory pain perdu she had while cooking in the south of France—almost got axed from the menu after Eater declared that shrimp toast was “having a moment” in L.A. and she was worried about people thinking she was trying to be “on trend.” She kept it on only after being convinced that few in Long Beach had ever heard of shrimp toast, a fact verified after confused customers had to have it explained to them as “like Texas toast covered in shrimp paste.”

“It feels good to cook and for people to just enjoy it with no pretention,” she says.

And people are definitely enjoying; permeating the Bamboo Club is a kind of lightly themed neighborhood-bar energy. On a recent evening, less than a week after Bamboo Club’s menu launch, a man came in and ordered the Thai tea-brined fried chicken sandwich, proudly proclaiming it to be his third one in as many days. The next time he came in, I watched as he saddled up to the bar, asked Ortiz what the daily special was and ordered it sight unseen. A plate of fried smelt emerged, covered in a fermented Fresno and pineapple hot glaze with a side of yuzu-kosho ranch. He dipped each one, then popped the fish whole into his mouth, licking his fingers like he was devouring a plate of wings.

There’s more to come too, like house-made Spam, mango sticky rice for dessert and whatever else Ortiz and her growing team of sharp, local cooks feel like experimenting with. This Sunday, to celebrate the opening of the themed-and-thatched back patio, Ortiz is planning to cook a feast fit for a luau. She ordered a 90-pound pig, which she will wrap in banana leaves and cook on hot rocks in the traditional Polynesian style.

“I just want to make good food in a city that I live in,” Ortiz says, beaming.

Trust me. Meli's food is the bomb!!!
Go enjoy but save some for me!!

T

It's great to see a tiki new bar putting time and effort into the food, many don't.

AND if you make great food and drinks it will show because people will talk about it and it won't feel all fake like it does when these new bar restaurants basically pay for good reviews with free stuff for the reviewers in the form of a party and free drinks when they come in.

If you open a new joint these days and don't hear much good feedback other than friends and family plus the guys you paid with a free party you may be in trouble.

The place looks kronkie, I like that in a tiki bar.

Good for them.

Article in The Press Telegram from Long Beach, CA

3 new dishes and drinks to pair them with at the tiki-themed Bamboo Club

HardCore Tiki MarketPlace July 6th and EVERY FIRST SATURDAY of each month!

Tiki Art, Tiki Vendors, Tiki Carvers, Tiki Bars, Tiki Decor and More!

Drink and Food specials!

Entertainment!

More info Soon!!!

Pages: 1 18 replies