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santa posted on Fri, Mar 23, 2018 3:05 PM

I'm looking to go to either tiki kon, hukilau or another multi day non California tiki event. I'm somewhat familiar with Portland and not with Fort Lauderdale. Other then the geographical /physical locations, and climate, what are the main differences between those events? Also is one easier to navigate without a rental car, using public transit or uber/lyft? Does one have events that are closer together? Is one less expensive including event tickets and close by hotels?
(Of course airfare is a big cost)..
I didn't see recent info here on tiki central.
Thanks

[ Edited by: santa 2018-03-27 14:37 ]

S
santa posted on Fri, Mar 23, 2018 3:07 PM

Does either event have more no-charge hotel room parties? Those are a highlight of any convention.

C

Don't forget about Ohana Luau at the Lake, which has all of that stuff you asked about.....room crawls, hotels walking distance to the host hotel for overflow, non-California, best bang for your buck in tiki, by far (INCLUDES full luau dinner & Polynesian show!)

BUT - we're SOLD OUT for 2018 - sold out in 36 hours (!!!!!), though there is a waitlist......!

http://www.fraternalorderofmoai.org/ohana/

S
santa posted on Sat, Mar 24, 2018 8:28 AM

Why are you mentioning it? The others are not sold out. It's easy to sell out tickets when a party has a very low attendance capacity limit. It would be harder to sell out a 10,000 person tiki festival.

[ Edited by: santa 2018-03-24 08:37 ]

S
santa posted on Sat, Mar 24, 2018 8:34 AM

I like the all inclusive part since all the other tiki fests nickel and dime guests with add on charges. But then yours says
"Thursday Night Kickoff Party – Lac du Saint Sacrement Steamship Cruise: $50/attendee"!

TD

I can't speak to Tiki Kon, but the Hukilau is all about seeing the Mai Kai and the Wreck Bar. Both events are going to have great bands and symposiums, but Ft. Lauderdale is like Mecca. You have to see the Mai Kai at least once in your lifetime.

The Hukilau does not focus on room parties; although, they do happen. Don't rent a car because parking is expensive, taxis are cheap, and the event has shuttles between the hotels and the Mai Kai.

S

I have not been to Tiki Kon yet, so I can't compare. I really want to get to it though. It seems a little smaller as they do a home bar tour. Maybe that part is smaller. That's good.

Hukilau is a no car needed event. Everything at the hotel or the Mai-Kai and there are shuttles to the Mai-Kai or share a taxi/uber or hitch a ride with someone driving. There are no formal room crawls and the room party has not been a big thing there for a while. Last few years it's been hanging out at the pool late nights instead.

Hukilau is pretty non-stop like Tiki Oasis. You don't have to do everything, but if you do you'll be going from about 10AM to midnight or later. Some described it to me as Hukilau and TO are no downtime, Ohana is all down time. I do not try to attend everything, but I am not a normal attendee at Hukilau being a speaker usually. I'm hosting a free cocktail event in one of the rooms this year TBA.

Look at the Hukilau event schedule. See if there is enough to make you want to go. The Mai-Kai is certainly worth getting to. Saturday night with live exotica bands playing and hundreds of Tiki fans in a bright array of aloha wear is very special.

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santa posted on Sat, Mar 24, 2018 9:04 AM

It seems like reservations are required to get into the mai kai for the duration of hukilau. Is that right?

Tiki Con Arizona this Friday, March 30, 2018. The Rhythm Room in Phoenix.
https://www.tikicon.com/

Checkout tiki Arizona style. Surf and rockabilly, burlesque, exotica and lounge, vintage car show, tropical drinks, island BBQ, tikis and more.

Tiki Republic will be in the house!





S
santa posted on Sun, Mar 25, 2018 5:11 PM

If it was a full weekend I'd go. Looks great! Expand it to Friday-Sunday

S

On 2018-03-24 09:04, santa wrote:
It seems like reservations are required to get into the mai kai for the duration of hukilau. Is that right?

Only Saturday. The Mai-Kai is essentially reserved for a private party Saturday and you have to have a Hukilau wrist band to enter. ANd you have to have a 1st dinner show reservation to enter when they open. It's a crowd control thing. 600 people can't fit int he Molokai Bar...

T

On 2018-03-25 17:11, santa wrote:
If it was a full weekend I'd go. Looks great! Expand it to Friday-Sunday

"more no-charge hotel room parties? Those are a highlight of any convention"

So if they add two more days on you will come and spend very little cash?
These events can't live on room parties, they need to generate revenue to be able to pay for the venue and bands etc.

And even the "we do it for the Charity" events get perks or flat out make money to host the event.

Yes, they do it for the money.

Swanky is right, the Hukilau has not been room-party-centric. BUT:

  1. A few people at the Hukilau still have room parties, and I attended a very good one last year which was hosted by a very friendly and generous TC'er. So they do occur.
  2. The Hukilau has an incredible outdoor pool party with no-limit bar tents from a dizzying array of international bars and bartenders. Plus they have the most boozy "Tiki Tower Takeover" which is also no-limits, world-class, expensive to put on, and in the stunning rotating restaurant atop the tower. These events are so good that they really eclipse any room parties. Sure, it costs money to attend. But if you're coming from out-of-state or from another continent, you're guaranteed a spot and you will have a very good time. This totally makes sense - these are premium and high-quality events and experiences.
  3. The Hukilau cocktail and rum seminars are of very high quality, and you can do plenty of drinking there.
  4. Evenings are perfect for room parties, but then you'd miss out on the lineup of musical performers, so it is hard to have both going on without drawing the ire of attendees. It's a case of which do you want more - top-notch musical entertainment in a larger venue with cocktails, or room parties in much smaller venues? Both have pros and cons, so I'm just saying that you can't judge easily in light of the magnitude of the musical talent which is offered.

The "success" of the event for me is how I manage what the organizers offer. Room parties, while loads of fun, are easily overshadowed by the magnitude of what the organizers are presenting. Best example is how the pool party has a ton of attendies, a ton of tents and cocktails, and relatively short lines to be served. Plus the bars give away some really cool swizzles and a few other things you will really appreciate.

I hope that helps with your investigation.

S
santa posted on Mon, Mar 26, 2018 5:35 PM

Tikiskip we all know that half or more of the revenue of these events is made from vendor sales, add on sales, room sales, food sales and drink sales.
The room party sponsors are bars and liquor companies. They are doing marketing and sales promotion. I haven't seen the books but if the tiki fests were not profitable they wouldn't continue.
It's impossible to go to any tiki fest and not spend money.
Also all the venues are gaining valuable publicity. It's obviously a win win.

The choice might be a bit moot as far as this year is concerned. I believe that Tiki Kon is sold out.

I have not yet been to either (Going to Tiki Kon this year though!) but from what I understand, I believe what has been stated is true. Tiki Kon = more intimate, Hukilau = bigger fiesta.

T

“The room party sponsors are bars and liquor companies.”
The ones I have been to were not sponsored by anyone, maybe at TO they are, but would guess it is rare for a liquor company to do this in most cases.

“if the tiki fests were not profitable they wouldn't continue.”
Some have gone down Don The Beachcomber, Sunset Beach, CA is one that will go away, can’t say if that’s all money driven but going to the Don event and not supporting it by buying something helps no one.

Kahiki here went down because of low cash flow, Surf Ohio is gone for the same reason, the other Hukilau lasted only one year, luau by the Sea I think it was.
Mojave Oasis is gone too so we have lost some events.

Low cash flow killed Tropical bistro as the tiki folks spent very little there coming in drunk or maybe getting high in the parking lot.

Low cash flow is what killed most of the tiki bars from days gone by don’t kid yourself.

When I vended at Hukilau we had to buy tickets, get a room, drive down there from Ohio and all so we could vend and spend almost EVERY hour at the booth.
Think about those people that basically pay to be an attraction at the event.
THEN they told us we had to go to the last sitting at the Mai Kai, it was late so we ate at almost 11:00 and there was none of that tiki BS that goes on.

I did very well selling but could have pack up after the first day and been great, as we sold most of our stuff the first day.
Not as much tiki vended at that event I went to as the tiki folks got hip quick and did not come back to sell.
The tiki ones you did see were the "Tiki stars" that got a free ride to come to the event and vend for say one day.

Sorry to rant but owning a diner for ten years and growing up for a lifetime in the business gives you a different view of the situation.

I had a guy that would come in ask for a large glass of water with lots of lemon and then put tons of sugar in it and make himself a free lemonade!
AND he owned a bail bonds place so he could afford a damn drink.

All I ask is think of the wait staff the bar owner, hotel owner, restaurant owner, and all the other people involved in where you go.

They many times are NOT making as much money as you think they are.
And it’s too late to help when they can’t pay the bills.

On your question save lots o cash and go to Hukilau Or Tiki Oasis as they are the best in my book.

[ Edited by: tikiskip 2018-03-27 05:42 ]

S

I can say that the money made at Hukilau is not justification for doing the event. Don't want to talk a lot on that, but just say that you spend an entire year working on an event that lasts just a long weekend. Almost every day you are doing something and many days you are doing a LOT. Some years you don't make anything. Some years you lose money. Done well and if everyone shows up that you expect, you can make a decent pay day, but probably not worth the effort.

For someone like skip driving in from Ohio, it can be a pain. The local FL vendors and performers and attendees have it a lot easier. Many really depend on the event.

The Mai-Kai gets a lot of attention and it helps them to get the big spotlight. That's the bottom line for me. Supporting Hukilau supports the Mai-Kai.

T

"The local FL vendors"
The guy across from us sold like one thing ALL weekend.
He just shook his head as we sold almost everything the first day.
He was selling cheesy painted surf board things, I think the one sale was to a non tiki person from when they let the public in.
Looked like he had two vending spaces too, Man I felt bad for that guy.

"Supporting Hukilau supports the Mai-Kai" And that is great!
But don't leave out the Yankee Clipper, and the Bahia Cabana, and even the bands that play plus the venders and makers of tiki.
The book writers like Sven and Jeff, Martin, I think you wrote a book too Tim, love it.

So one hand washes the other.
Do you think Robert Drasnin would have done another album if not for Hukilau?
I don't.

BUT books that don't sell don't get published, Tiki that does not sell does not get made.
And without that other tiki crap Hukilau is just a bunch of people going out to dinner at the same time with snappy clothes on.

Sorry to talk about the cash thing so much but it relates to this thread as the starting posts seemed to be looking for a cheap tiki thrill event.

S
santa posted on Tue, Mar 27, 2018 2:03 PM

I hear you. For those attendees like me traveling from out of state to attend we add on hundreds of dollars in airfare and hotel and meals. That's before the first mai tai and Mug purchase.
I thought the ticket sales would sustain the events. My thought is that the tiki trend peaked in past years. Now in the tiki resurgence , it will peak and then lull again.
It's still a niche culture with a limited fan base. Because of the high prices to partake its harder for lower income folks to spend a Lot on it .

[ Edited by: santa 2018-03-27 14:18 ]

T

I have had lots o money to spend at one time in my life and then not so much to spend at times too so I get that sometimes the cash just is not there.

And even when I had lots o cash at times I would say that's just not worth it.

Myself I have problems going to some tiki bars as they just flat out charge too much for me to go there drink and have fun knowing a huge bill is coming for so so drinks at the end of the night.

But have seen people who are just cheap, they could spend but just can't do it.
Even some of the ones who go to an event, make money selling tiki crap at that event and STILL don't drop a dime.

These chepos by going displace a person who would have gone and helped the event by buying a few things.

These events do cost a lot to go to especially if you have to travel far but if you are going to fork over that cash at least go to an event that is worth it.

The events in my opinion that don't cost as much don't give you as much fun in return and can be a bit clique driven.
If you are in the clique you will have fun, if not it can feel odd to be there.

That's what I have seen and that's what I've been told.

I really do want you to have a great time at whatever event you choose as keeping people happy at the events keeps tiki alive and well.

And I may want to spend my whole tiki event stuck behind a booth selling tiki every hour of the event and eat last in the future so the events need to thrive.

Hey event runners how about a free custom shirt or mug or some kind of thank you to the venders who sell at your events.
Instead of the "you guys eat last after all the fun is done" treatment.

[ Edited by: tikiskip 2018-03-28 06:04 ]

I will say that, coming from a background in genre conventions, some of the same problems exist there as well (or at least equivalent sticking points). Some affordable, non-profit, regional events are barely scraping by, whereas large, high-profile events that exist seemingly to wring every single penny from patrons and vendors are raking in money hand over fist (whilst treating pretty much everyone as a mark). Then there are the former that try to evolve into the latter, and more often than not become the headlines you read about when the convention goes belly-up halfway through the weekend and the venue locks up and kicks everyone out.

Hitting the sweet spot--and sticking to it--where patrons, vendors and the staff are able to genuinely enjoy the event without going into hock seems elusive, regardless of the subject matter being celebrated.

S
santa posted on Wed, Mar 28, 2018 9:43 AM

What are keys to success? Sales? General marketing? The field interests me if the risks can be made lower. Thanks for the great posts!

On 2018-03-28 09:43, santa wrote:
What are keys to success? Sales? General marketing? The field interests me if the risks can be made lower. Thanks for the great posts!

Yes to the above. The big expense, though, is the venue. I've never been involved directly with negotiations, but I know folks who are. Events guarantee a certain number of booked room nights in the contract in order to have access to the event rooms for panels, seminars, vendors, etc. If bookings fall short by even just a few rooms, the event organizers are on the hook for all rental fees. That can be devastating. I know once convention a few years ago that got the deadline for room bookings extended, then actually offered to subsidize attendees' lodging because they were so far short on contracted rooms. They were looking at outright bankruptcy otherwise.

People who haven't been involved in organizing conventions and conferences grossly underestimate the expense that goes into these thing. It's not just Spanky, Darla and Alfalfa "putting on a show." Marketing, in particular, is often overlooked. I was involved with a science fiction convention decades ago that blew its entire budget on some Star Trek actors. They slashed the P.R. budget, reasoning "These folks are so famous people will flock to see them regardless of what we do!" Um, no. It was a complete disaster. At the same time, marketing doesn't mean just throw money at the problem. I've seen other local conventions blow the entire marketing budget by taking out ad space in national publications. It's nice that people in New York and LA are aware of your event, but exactly zero booked flights and hotels to come visit Houston in July. "Fiscally conservative and strategically smart" is the best approach, but even the folks behind the disasters think that's what they're doing until it's too late.

I will say that, from my vantage point, the event-going tiki community seems more connected and communicative than other disparate special interest groups. Apart from Tiki Central and FOM, the existing big events likely have extensive mailing lists that could be licensed. And those events are scheduled well in advance, so any new tiki event would be wise to establish a presence at Hukilau, Tiki Kon, Oasis, Caliente, Luau etc. to promote the event and lock in as many pre-sale memberships as possible. Such strategies are well-established. Having some committed headlining Guests of Honor doesn't hurt, either.

S

The hotel is a big part. You don't make a ton of money from it, but as he says, you sign a contract to book a certain number of rooms to get the free convention space. Staying in the host hotel is a big part of what allows the event to happen.

These days, every event at Hukilau also includes a free cocktail. Pretty much every presentation welcomes you with a drink. It's become standard. At Oasis too.

T

“These days, every event at Hukilau also includes a free cocktail”
If you are stuck at a table vending you don’t get one, F-u venders.
Kinda of a joke, but then it was different set of people running the show back when I went.
I'm sure that one of the "Legends of Tiki" will go up to each vender with a free drink and a thank you this year.

“I've seen other local conventions blow the entire marketing budget by taking out ad space in national publications”

Heck the big tiki events you see now I would bet you that most if not all of their marketing was Tiki Central, that and a few flyers they printed up when they started.
Now that they are big they can ride off the common knowledge of the event and market less.

Some of these events don’t post info or even pictures of the event on TC anymore and have forgotten who brought them to the dance.

Should the attendance cool off at one of these events look for them to be right back here at the top of the cool and current list.

At the Hukilau for the last couple of years, we have had rum sponsors set up in the hallway right in front of the vendor area, so I'm sure it would have been no problem for the vendors to get someone to pass them a cocktail or two!

T

"I'm sure it would have been no problem for the vendors to get someone to pass them a cocktail or two!"

I think you miss the point.
it's not about a free drink, it's about saying thanks for spending your weekend here vending and missing all of Hukilau.

My wife and I paid for tickets and then paid for a vending spot, plus travel and hotel room.
Now this was our choice and we did make money would say we did in the top five as far as money goes.
With that said we MAY have broke even, as in no profit.

So what we thought we would get out of the vending was money to see at least SOME of the event.
But the hours are so long to vend you really are just paying to be a spectacle at the show.
In fact people pay extra to get in to the vendors early.

The vendors at least when I went were treated like second class citizens.
Vendors who paid to be there, not the vendors that get a free ride to vend there for one day.

If you have to travel to Hukilau to vend, At least back then.
Vending at Hukilau was a suckers bet.

And I like Hukilau, just not vending there.
Maybe it has changed, I hope so cuz it needed to.

S
santa posted on Fri, Mar 30, 2018 6:22 PM

I don't understand why you'd buy a ticket to vend? You are paying a fee to sell. That should cover your entry ticket. If you sell stuff at a music festival do you also buy a full priced ticket?! Makes no sense.

"You are paying a fee to sell."

I know I paid for my wife and I paid for myself.
Need to find the packet to get info.

Think I saw that it is $425.00 to sell this year is that right?
The south seas pass is $399.00, so you pay more to sell than the most inclusive pass?

People don't make that much vending there, heck the crap you sell costs something, if not that and your time if you make the stuff you sell, and setting that crap up plus tear down.

I make more selling ONE light on eBay.

It is a great way to let people see what you make, and showcase your work.

That's why you see all the known artist selling in their rooms, or heck just walking down the aisle.
That's how I bought Mai Tiki.

I don't blame them, I would do it too if I could get away with it.

If your not known you will get booted for this so watch out, I would get booted for this.

Who loves ya baby!
Mai Tiki....

S
Swanky posted on Sun, Apr 1, 2018 6:01 AM

I went back and looked at my budget for Hukilau 2004. Vendors paid $55. The mug by Derek was $30 which I recall was a very high price for the time. There was one night with a ticket and that was $15. $15 got you I Belli di Waikiki from Italy, Tongo Hiti and Johnny Knox from Atlanta, King Kukulele from CA, the legend Billy Mure and Big Pineapple and the Vodkanauts from FL.

And I was totally excited that in the budget, if 300 people showed I'd be making $8k that year. We actually had more like 500-700, and then the hurricane came.

The good old days.

T

I Belli di Waikiki what happened to those guys?
They were great!

Yeah $425.00 is too much for a vending space.

These events start out all low key and cool then get a bit bigger and that's ok too.
BUT when they blow up and the price goes way up then you can't get tickets heck you compete for tickets with Joe blow Johnny come lately for a ticket.
Or worse some guy who knows people or is famous.

Hukilau back when I went the first time was way fun!
Wait no that was the second one, in 2003 as we also went to the very first one in Atlanta.
Then it became some Star F#*ker fest where if you were not in FU, that's the year I vended, and going to the event is way more fun than vending.

That was the year they had "THE LEGENS OF TIKI" presentation what a joke.(2003?)
I deem myself king of all that is tiki, Ha!

[ Edited by: tikiskip 2018-04-01 06:41 ]

T

"And I was totally excited that in the budget, if 300 people showed I'd be making $8k that year."

So now Hukilau makes more than the $8k that you were looking at making off VENDERS ALONE!?

S
santa posted on Mon, Apr 9, 2018 9:59 PM

Skip what do you really think?

Har!
Believe it or not I DO hold back on what I really think.

When I get in the nursing home I'm going to really let it rip.

Skip in a nursing home...

Riding around in a motorized wheelchair...

Wildly waving a carved tiki-style cane in the air...

Chasing all the nurses, poking them with his cane, and raising all sorts of havoc.

Go Skip, go!!! :)

T

"Chasing all the nurses"

OMG!
Have you seen the people that work in those places, er no.
Hell would be a long life in a nursing home.

You know what they say, you don't see many old fat people.

S
santa posted on Tue, Feb 4, 2020 9:06 PM

This is hysterical: A person that wants to shop for a day at Ohana on the lake (like at every other con) is a "garbage person". How very welcoming, inclusive and Ohana of you! "No. There are no single-day tickets (apart from the Thursday night kick-off party). Your Ohana ticket is good for the entire weekend, and we only sell weekend tickets. I can make the case that even if you can only join us for one day, the ticket price is still well worth the value. If you don’t have a ticket, we ask that you please stay home and try to join us next year. Yes, there is security that will throw you out, and do you really want to be the kind of person who crashes a charity event? That person is a garbage person. Don’t be that person. You’re better than that."
This is rural upstate New York we are talking about.
Even the Palm Springs tiki con that brags about its off duty cops, MMA practicing security squad allows the public in free on Sunday!
Its charity because 100% of the proceeds are given away to charity and you're an IRS registered non profit?

On 2020-02-04 21:06, santa wrote:
This is hysterical: A person that wants to shop for a day at Ohana on the lake (like at every other con) is a "garbage person". How very welcoming, inclusive and Ohana of you! "No. There are no single-day tickets (apart from the Thursday night kick-off party). Your Ohana ticket is good for the entire weekend, and we only sell weekend tickets. I can make the case that even if you can only join us for one day, the ticket price is still well worth the value. If you don’t have a ticket, we ask that you please stay home and try to join us next year. Yes, there is security that will throw you out, and do you really want to be the kind of person who crashes a charity event? That person is a garbage person. Don’t be that person. You’re better than that."
This is rural upstate New York we are talking about.
Even the Palm Springs tiki con that brags about its off duty cops, MMA practicing security squad allows the public in free on Sunday!
Its charity because 100% of the proceeds are given away to charity and you're an IRS registered non profit?

I didn't find the term "garbage person" in this thread ahead of you, maybe it was edited out or deleted by the original poster?

In all cases, the event organizers own their event and with regard to pricing and tickets, for good or bad, their decisions are theirs alone. There has been some discussion that pricing has "gone too high," and that assessment is on each of us to weigh and make. That has also been discussed elsewhere here. So I don't see any need to go fishing for controversy -- it looks like it's been one year and nine months since the post before yours was made to this thread, LOL!

Maybe I'm missing something, but I'm scratching my head a bit, ha...


I'm worried that my "check liver" light will come on soon...

T

I can tell you I never used the term "garbage person" here or anywhere.
What the heck are you talking about?

Also I want to say I have NO connection with Ohana on the lake or any other event.

The questions you raise are mostly prickly the kind of stuff you know nobodies going to talk about, and often about the Money, money, money.
I know I can also throw some prickly BS myself but try at least every now and then to also give something good to TC.

DAMN have you had this on your mind for NINE months?
The thing with you Santa most of your posts are....

"Is Hanford Leemoore your real name? Did you meet Jennifer Thompson in person? Are you still friends?"

"Looks like I have to buy the book to get list of bars then spend a year and $5,000 traveling
aLooks like I have to buy the book to get list of bars then spend a year and $5,000 traveling to visit Places and bars I wouldn’t Want to go to. Then I might get $2,500. Not good.nd"

"How much do tiki events earn?
bSkip, which large events have you 100% promoted? Then why are you offended or commenting about a question not related to you that you have no experience with or advice on? From what I’ve seen the big events totally sell out all the rooms, bar, restaurant and conference rooms. That makes me think the producer and promoter might not pay rent. Unless people pay cash for everything it’s unlikely all their corporate expenses and profits are hidden from the franchise tax board or irs. I’m not talking about a cash only bar restaurant .
Is that what you stiffed the taxman on?"

So this thread suddenly got weird...

S
santa posted on Sat, Feb 8, 2020 8:33 AM

Skip if you hate my posts why are you obsessed on commenting on them? Find a new hobby and a new person to be a fan of. I took the verbiage straight from Ohana on the lakes website about garbage people . AKA folks that want to shop without paying $300 to go to a swap meet, which is what the vending parts of conventions are.

[ Edited by: santa 2020-02-08 08:35 ]

On 2020-02-08 08:33, santa wrote:
I took the verbiage straight from Ohana on the lakes website about garbage people . AKA folks that want to shop without paying $300 to go to a swap meet, which is what the vending parts of conventions are.

Speaking of vending, and as one who has attended close to 15 big tiki cons and plans to attend more around the country:
I think the "vending" comments are a broad generalization. It's not without merit, but it is a broad generalization. The vending stuff serves many purposes, including as a platform for some distilled spirits companies to showcase their products. And also for casual book (and other) signings that both the authors and artists and attendees appreciate. Some examples are Martin Cate, Jeff Berry, and even Shag. Sometimes the vending is in the same room with a big stage and the room doubles as a performance venue.

It's my opinion that we shouldn't get stuck on broad generalizations or defend-to-the-death our own personal views which may be narrower than others. And we should also recognize that if we pulled the vending from these events, there would also be an uproar.

With regard to "garbage people," well, that's definitely bad stuff from ONE web site. It does not represent either my view or what I mostly see in the tiki community at large. Some folks are just plain crude at times. I've put my foot in my mouth too.

And to Skip - dude, you're a gem with a lot of tiki experiences and involvement in tiki and also in the restaurant industry. Keep on keeping on. santa, I value your comments, they have merit, I appreciate the friendly and thought-provoking conversation.

Have a good drink and a hearty laugh, everyone!


I have a cool-looking tip tray at my bar. People ask about it all the time and I tell them anyone can own one. They're very easy to get - you can get one at any restaurant! :)

C
croe67 posted on Sun, Feb 9, 2020 4:41 PM

As is pointed out above, each event makes its own choices on security & opening up the event to others. Ohana chooses not to because we are a charity. Our event, our choice.
If you don't like it, that's OK. Then don't come. But why revisit this topic 9 months later to pick at the wound, again?

& I also do not know where $300 came from.
In the case of Ohana tickets are in the $100 range for the weekend & all seminars are INCLUDED (no additional tickets) - the only additional fee is for the optional kick-off party, which is generally in the $25-40 range to cover food for that event

After sitting on this for 9 months as this thread was dormant, it's clear you have a bone to pick with Ohana & your own personal agenda that is causing you to troll the event here. You're just grinding your axe.

[ Edited by: croe67 2020-02-09 17:47 ]

C
croe67 posted on Sun, Feb 9, 2020 5:51 PM

And, just to clarify.
If you have been told that the event is ticket holders only & that security will remove any non-ticket holders well in advance of the event.
Then, you decide to show-up & intentionally crash the event, which is also a charity event?
Yes, then "garbage people" is appropriate, along with plenty of less-nice words.

T

"Skip if you hate my posts why are you obsessed on commenting on them?"

Well I don't hate your posts, they are just often "prickly" is the best word I can find.
And I was one of the few people that gave you any kind of answer in the past it just was not what you wanted to hear.

Also my bad as I thought you were saying I said that "garbage people" thing, the only time I think I have ever said that was when I was talking about the people that pick up our trash on Wednesday.

As in "have the garbage people been here yet?"

I don't read any FOM stuff so I would not see any of that FYI.

Thanks Ace!

One more thing Santa as I have not looked but do you ever post about your home bar or a tiki mug you have found maybe some tiki art you have made or bought.
What are your other tiki interests? it feels like it's more of a I want to start an event and how can I do it and make money thing.

I will try to steer clear of your posts Santa, am I now the naughty list?

T

You know as I thought about it Santa I WAS one of those "garbage people" the FOM was talking about.

We went to the last Hula Hop right when it started and really only wanted a George mug they only had them at that time for the most part.

BUT you could feel the "get out of here skip" so it was good that we ran in and ran out and just bought stuff.
Kinda funny but at some of the events we have been to we don't feel the aloha (Not just FOM)so maybe there are "garbage event runners" too.

PLUS if your event is so affordable one might ask ones self "why do people want to take the time/money to come to the event but not get tickets and really come to the event?

In the restaurant biz you know your best and your worst customers the most.
But on the slow days you look around and its those people you really don't like so much that seem to fill the place and help keep you open so we always tried to make everyone feel welcome as best we could.

It's part of the reason I'm not so agreeable these days as I have kissed so much a$$ that my lips are brown and I don't have to do that anymore.

The world has gotten so "your in, your out" that even the people that should be treating you like a customer or an asset now get a pained look as they take your money, money that pays their salary or charity.

S
santa posted on Tue, Feb 18, 2020 1:50 PM

Croe67, I am the original poster. I’m free to comment on my own thread forever. You crashed and highjacked my thread to promote your exclusionary Ohana on the lake party event which I never mentioned. I have no interest in it. No one who lives more then 100 miles from it has interest in it. People from California don’t visit New York State fairs either. But you wanted to sell tickets. I’ve already been to that part of the country. I’d go there to enjoy the outdoors in the four months it’s snow free. I’d never go there For your unfriendly party when you have a terrible attitude. It’s obviously a small , cheap regional NorthEast event that no one would travel long distances for . On the one hand you wanted to use my thread to sell tickets. On the other hand you’re defensive about keeping out the “others” who aren’t part of your clique. The idea that hordes of people would crash a remote rural country house party is laughable at best. That’s not welcoming and is not in the Ohana spirit. It’s the money seeking spirit. But I’m glad that this exposed the fact that tiki cons are at heart money making events. Also since you’re claiming to be a non profit tax exempt charity, where do we find your IRS and New York State financials to show how much is spent on overhead and how much goes to the charity? Skip, every reply you have turns into a tirade against whatever is angering you at the moment. I’m not an obsessive collector and have other hobbies then tiki. I am interested in enjoying the hobby without going broke. Not all of us are millionaires who can drop $1000 per day on a hobby. My every post is not lusting after a $500 mug.

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